+0
When you use two possessive proper nouns in a sentence, such as "John and Vicky's father arrived Tuesday,", is it also correct to say John's and Vicky's father arrived Tuesday? or is only the first form the correct one? thanks
Comments  
I think they might mean something different.

John and Vicky's father may be two different people: one is John and the other Vicky's father.

John's and Vicky's father is only one person.
John and Vicky's father may be two different people


This is possible, but not the expected interpretation. The rule is:

"Compound Possessives

When you are showing possession with compounded nouns, the apostrophe's placement depends on whether the nouns are acting separately or together.

1. Miguel's and Cecilia's new cars are in the parking lot.
This means that each of them has at least one new car and that their ownership is a separate matter.

2. Miguel and Cecilia's new cars are in the parking lot.
This construction tells us that Miguel and Cecilia share ownership of these cars. The possessive (indicated by 's) belongs to the entire phrase, not just to Cecilia."
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
"John and Vicky's father" is correct.

If there are two fathers, it's "John's father and Vicky's father" or "John's and Vicky's fathers", the first being somewhat awkward, and the second being somewhat awkward. Emotion: smile
Guest,

This sentence is rather unclear. "John and Vicky's father" could mean the persons arrived on

Tuesday were John himself (not his father) and Vicky's father. But i also agree with CJ that

both sentences are somewhat awkward, vicky might have more than one father. So to

avoid any ambiguity, it is better to use 'John's father and vicky's father' if you intend to say

both fathers arrived Tuesday.

Just my 2cent.
The following is from notefull.com:

If two or more nouns possess the same thing, the last noun should carry an “ ‘s “:

Jenny and David’s car
(they both own the car)

If each noun possesses the same class of thing, then both should carry an “ ‘s “:

Jenny’s and David’s cars
(they each have a few cars)
Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.
Jenny’s and David’s cars
(they each have a few cars)
Not necessarily. They could each have one car.

CJ