+0
My, our, your, etc.... - are they possessive pronouns (which is known from every book on English that I own) or possessive adjectives?
+1
Ruslan L.My, our, your, etc. - are they possessive pronouns … or possessive adjectives?
They are genitive* pronouns, inflectional forms of I, we, and you respectively. They can FUNCTION as determiner in noun phrase structure (My shoe is missing) or as subject of a gerund-participial clause (There is no way of knowing how he may react to your being here). Notice that my and your can be replaced by nouns (Max’s shoe is missing; …to Max’s/Max being here) but not adjectives (*Blue shoe is missing; *…to stubborn being here), so they are clearly not adjectives.

*This term is preferable to “possessive”, since the relation between the genitive pronoun and the following head is by no means limited to that of possession. Consider such phrases as her father, her friends, her infancy, her anger, her lack of money, her refusal to compromise. None of these permits a natural paraphrase with possess, in the way that her car can be paraphrased as the car she possesses.
+0
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
+0
If you take a look at a lot of different books, you'll find a lot of different terminology. These are my recommendations. These will be understood by almost everybody on this website.

I, you, he, she, we, they, ... personal pronouns - nominative
me, you, him, her, us, them, ... personal pronouns - objective
my, your, his, her, our, their, ... possessive determiners / possessive adjectives*
mine, yours, his, hers, ours, theirs, ... possessive pronouns
myself, yourself, himself, herself, ourselves, themselves, ... reflexive pronouns

CJ

*Some people will find the term "determiners" strange; some people will object to the term "adjective". You almost can't win on this one. Emotion: smile
1 2
Comments  
There were possessive pronouns and absolute forms of possessives as they were called in books.
 GPY's reply was promoted to an answer.
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
 CalifJim's reply was promoted to an answer.
 RandomGuy's reply was promoted to an answer.
Aspara GusThis term is preferable to “possessive”, since the relation between the genitive pronoun and the following head is by no means limited to that of possession.
Which term is preferable to "objective", since "objects" are not limited to inanimates, e.g., I invited Laura? (We cannot say that Laura is an object.)

CJ
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
CalifJimWhich term is preferable to "objective", since "objects" are not limited to inanimates, e.g., I invited Laura? (We cannot say that Laura is an object.)
My grammar uses “accusative”.
Aspara GusNotice that my and your can be replaced by nouns ... Max’s shoe is missing ...
Not in my book. If that replacement is possible, then we should have [My / Max / Larry / The leader] shoe is missing.

CJ
Aspara GusMy grammar uses “accusative”.
Isn't it odd that so much of modern grammar came about together with a movement that said, "Oh, those inept grammarians of the past! They just wanted to squeeze English into the patterns of Latin. They just could not see that English grammar is not Latin grammar." Now we're back to "genitive" and "accusative". Emotion: big smile

CJ
Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.
Show more