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Hello, I'm studying apposition clauses and these below are examples of it:

There's always a possibility that he might go back to Seattle.

There is a possibility that they will start picking at each other.

There seems to be not much of a difference between them, so is it okay to conlude that 'might' and 'will' mean the same in those two sentences? Thanks a lot! (_ _)
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Well the first is a bit more tentative than the second, but practically speaking, they have the same intent.
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Well, I think 'might' adds a little redundancy to the sentence, as the word 'possibility' has already signified 'tentativeness'.

However, while speaking, one can use any.