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Hi teachers,
Context:
A: Your train departs from platform eight.
Question:
Where is his train leaving from?
It's leaving from platform eight.
My questions:
a) Would that question be appropriate in order to have a win-win situation for the students. They practice both tenses.
b) Can the question be in the present progressive and the sentence from the text is in the simple present?
c) Do I have to use only the simple present for my question because that's the one in the original sentence?

Thanks in advance.
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Comments  
I suggest that you stick to one tense throughout unless you provide a broader context. For example:

Context:
Train A (usually) departs from platform eight.
Today is Friday and John is already inside the train. It is departing.

Question:
Where is his train leaving from? or better yet, Which platform is his train leaving from?

Answer:
It's leaving from platform eight.

Of course the present progressive tense can also be used to talk about the immediate future, depending on context.
Hi ozzourti,
Thanks for your reply.
In your opinion, it would be less confusing if the students were asked to frame questions and answers using the tense used in the original text. Right?
Another context:
At the station, Peter buys a train ticket to London.
It will be better to ask to the students:
What does Peter do at the station?
Than:
What’s Peter doing at the station?
Am I right?
Of course the present progressive tense can also be used to talk about the immediate future, depending on context.
That's not mi intention in that question.

TL
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I think there's a conflict between what I would call the narrative present and the "actual" (for lack of a better word) present.

At the station, Peter buys a train ticket to London. is fine in the narrative mode.

The problem arises when we ask the question What does Peter do at the station?, as taken out of context it could well refer to a habitual action.

With that being said, I still suggest that you pick one tense and stick to it.
ozzourtiAt the station, Peter buys a train ticket to London. is fine in the narrative mode.The problem arises when we ask the question What does Peter do at the station?, as taken out of context it could well refer to a habitual action.
Hi ozzourti,
Thanks for your reply. That is the reason for which I was asking if the present progressive was possible.
ozzourtiWith that being said, I still suggest that you pick one tense and stick to it.
I appreciate your suggestion.

TL
Tenacious LearnerWould that question be appropriate ...
It would be to me.
Tenacious LearnerCan the question be in the present progressive and the sentence from the text is be in the simple present?
Yes. It happens thousands of times in ordinary conversations.
Tenacious LearnerDo I have to use only the simple present for my question because that's the one in the original sentence?
No. Both the simple present and the present continuous can suggest the future.

— Aren't you going to Chicago next Thursday?
— Yes. I leave at 6 in the morning.

CJ
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CalifJimIt would be to me.
Hi Jim,
Thanks a lot for for your help. Then, if the question is in the present continuous indicating that something is happening at the moment of speaking is not possible, It's indicating future in the following situation. Right?
Context:
A: Your train departs from platform eight.
Question:
Where is his train leaving in ten minutes from?
It's leaving from platform eight.
Tenacious LearnerCan the question be in the present progressive and the sentence from the text be in the simple present? CalifJimYes. It happens thousands of times in ordinary conversations.
So, I can mix those tenses without any problem, as I've said in order to have a win-win situation for the students. They practice both tenses; despite what the tense is in the the source material.
Tenacious Learner: Do I have to use only the simple present for my question because that's the one in the original sentence? CalifJim: Both the simple present and the present continuous can suggest the future.— Aren't you going to Chicago next Thursday?— Yes. I leave at 6 in the morning.
My idea was not to use those tenses as future. Though they perfectly work in that situation.

TL
CalifJimNo. Both the simple present and the present continuous can suggest the future.
Yes, but I don't think that the present simple tense in Tenacious Learner's second example can suggest the future in any way.

What is Peter doing at the station? is a perfectly valid question but I, for one, would prefer for the original sentence to be written in the continuous tense as well. Perhaps the choice of the verb is unfortunate here because "buying" is a relatively short process, so when I hear At the station, Peter buys a train ticket to London., I instantly picture said ticket already being in Peter's possession. So what is he really doing at the station now? Maybe I'm just imagining this but I don't know... The change from the present simple to the present continuous in the train example is much more acceptable in my book since both the original sentence and the question may point to the future but in the second case (where both tenses seem to refer to the present) I'm not so happy with it...
ozzourtiYes, but I don't think that the present simple tense in Tenacious Learner's second example can suggest the future in any way.
Right. I haven't gotten that far yet. Emotion: smile

CJ
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