I'm looking for a word to describe a modification made to give an appearance of continuity.
For example, after the the Indiana Jones trilogy was made, the first film, "Raiders of the Lost Ark" was renamed "Indiana Jones and the Raiders of the Lost Ark" to make the trilogy seem planned. How should I describe this renaming?
~Iain
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I'm looking for a word to describe a modification made to give an appearance of continuity. For example, after the ... Jones and the Raiders of the Lost Ark" to make the trilogy seem planned. How should I describe this renaming?

"Retronym" seems to have some currency to describe terms like this. Another example would be "analogue TV".
Matti
I'm looking for a word to describe a modification made to give an appearance of continuity. For example, after the ... Jones and the Raiders of the Lost Ark" to make the trilogy seem planned. How should I describe this renaming?

"Retronym" seems to have some currency to describe terms like this. Another example would be "analogue TV".
Can that also describe the inclusion of an "s" into "iland" to make is look related to "isla"?
~Iain
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I'm looking for a word to describe a modification made ... the trilogy seem planned. How should I describe this renaming?

:"Retronym" seems to have some currency to describe terms like this. :Another example would be "analogue TV". Can that also describe the inclusion of an "s" into "iland" to make is look related to "isla"?

No a different mechanism is involved there, one of mistaken etymology. A retronym is required when a new development means that a more specific or extended term is required for a thing.

Matti
Can that also describe the inclusion of an "s" into "iland" to make is look related to "isla"?

No a different mechanism is involved there, one of mistaken etymology. A retronym is required when a new development means that a more specific or extended term is required for a thing.

"World War I" strikes me as a pretty good example of a retronym.

Cheers, Harvey
Ottawa/Toronto/Edmonton for 30 years;
Southern England for the past 22 years.
(for e-mail, change harvey.news to harvey.van)
Matti Lamprhey wrote

A retronym is required when a new development means that a more specific or extended term is required for a thing.

"World War I" strikes me as a pretty good example of a retronym.

Yes. Also known by some as "the war to end all wars", and by others as "the war that ended up starting the next one".
Matti
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Matti Lamprhey wrote "World War I" strikes me as a pretty good example of a retronym.

Yes. Also known by some as "the war to end all wars", and by others as "the war that ended up starting the next one".

I've long been convinced that future historians will not view these as two wars, but as a 30-year war which had two major outbreaks and an intervening period of uneasy peace and some localised civil wars. (I think it'll be seen rather like the "Hundred Years War", which wasn't a century of unbroken battlefield encounters but was later seen as a "single" conflict.)

Cheers, Harvey
Ottawa/Toronto/Edmonton for 30 years;
Southern England for the past 22 years.
(for e-mail, change harvey.news to harvey.van)
"Retronym" isn't suitable for either example, given the definition. Pretend the S was inserted into "iland" deliberately what would that be? Can the same word be used to describe the Indiana Jones renaming? ~Iain
On 05 Jan 2005, Matti Lamprhey wrote

No a different mechanism is involved there, one of ... more specific or extended term is required for a thing.

"World War I" strikes me as a pretty good example of a retronym.

I suppose all monarchs' titles are subject to revision when a second one of the same name comes along. If we get another Stephen then "Stephen I" will come into use 850 years after his death.
Phil C.
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