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What's the difference between "powered with" and "powered by"? Also, "fueled with" and "fueled by"?

Is it subject/object related, like "powered by Fukushima Daiichi power plant", but "powered with electricity coming from Fukushima Daiichi"?
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Victor Dulepov (vicd)What's the difference between "powered with" and "powered by"? Also, "fueled with" and "fueled by"?
There isn't any difference. My personal preference is "by" in both cases.

CJ
Comments  
Victor Dulepov (vicd) What's the difference between "powered with" and "powered by"? Also, "fueled with" and "fueled by"?Is it subject/object related, like "powered by Fukushima Daiichi power plant", but "powered with electricity coming from Fukushima Daiichi"?
Power by/with v prep to give (something) power or driving force by means of (something such as engine): This boat is powered with the latest improved model of our most famous engine. [Longman Dictionary of Phrasal Verbs.]

According to the definition given in the dictionary it means the same.
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 CalifJim's reply was promoted to an answer.
I've got some doubts about "fuelled with" and "fuelled by". I'm a retired seaman and remember the chief engineers reports where they stated that the vessel had been fuelled with heavy fuel, diesel and lubrication oil by the bunker ship XY. So, my understanding is that there is a difference between "fuel with" and "fuel by" in such a case. I write it with some reservation as grammar and spelling weren't the strong points of seamen's English, a sort of international one.
AnonymousI've got some doubts about "fuelled with" and "fuelled by".
Yes. I think I'll have to change my opinion with regard to these.

This topic is actually more complex than it first appears. "with" introduces the substance that changes its location. "by" introduces the agent that causes the change, the agent that moves the substance. Thus, "fueled with oil by a ship". It is not always necessary to state both the substance and the agent, so either of the two phrases might be omitted in specific cases.

Similarly,

The wall was covered with paint by the workmen.
The tank was filled with water by the employees.
The Christmas tree was decorated with ornaments by the children.

The agent may be metaphoric. In such cases we get such expressions as "fueled by anger".

CJ
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