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In the following sentence is the word logged functioning as the predicate adjective/ subject compliment or is it a verb phrase, or could it be both?

Once the user passes authentication and the first part of authorization, the user is logged in to the client.

This second sentence is how my editor changed it to be "active" in her opinion.

Once the user passes authentication and the first part of authorization, the user logs in to the client.

My technical editor says "They actually mean the same thing, though one is passive and one is active. There is no difference grammatically, except that we cannot write in a passive voice in technical documentation. The only way you could interpret it differently is if something else is logging the user in -- if so, you need another noun to correct this."

My point is that the user is doing any action here and that's why I wrote it the way I did, using a linking verb and then logged to describe the state of the user after passing through the authentication process.
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Comments  (Page 2) 
Thank you everyone for your posts! I am so relieved to have found a place where there are others so understand these issues. I have learned to accept edits from technical editors that I don't always agree with because no one wants to have a discussion about every little word choice and writers all have their own style. Gosh, who has the time to trifle over every minor edit when you wouldn't write it exactly that way yourself. But when it affects technical accuracy or goes against the rules of grammar, I have to take a position for our user/customer base. No editor gets to make up their own rules of grammar, do they?

All of your posts have been so helpful! I will go back to my editor with the supporting materials I have gotten and try one last time. I will be keep this forum in my frequent places to visit list! I hope to also be able to help others when I am able to!

Dawn
Ironical how many typos and bad phrasing I made in my last post, though, haha. This is what happens when I am being informal!
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Nobody here seems immune from typos. The edit button gets used a lot by all of us, sometimes more than once on the same post.

Good luck with your editor, Dawnie.
In the following sentence is the word logged functioning as the predicate adjective/ subject compliment or is it a verb phrase, or could it be both?

Once the user passes authentication and the first part of authorization, the user is logged in to the client.

To supplement the previous replies:

There does seem to be an ambiguity in the original text:

1. Once the user passes authentication and the first part of authorization, the user is logged in to the client.

2. Once the user passes authentication and the first part of authorization, the user is logged in to the client.

In #1, I would take the underlined phrase as a subject complement, which describes the state of 'the user' after passing authentication, etc.

In #2, I would take the emboldened phrase as a passive verb, and the underlined phrase as an adverbial phrase. It describes 'what happens' after passing authentication, etc.

I would also query 'logged in to the client': this seems to conflate 'logged in' and 'logged into'.

But I may be talking through my hat.

MrP

But I may be talking through my hat.
albeit: your wizard's hat.
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I read your post and I have had those similar thoughts myself. Seems there are two issues here. The first issue is whether the original sentence and the edited sentence actually mean the same thing or not. The second issue is whether the original sentence means what it should mean or whether it could be rewritten to be clearer.

Regarding the first issue, my question is not really about passive versus active. My point is that the editor changed the word "user" from the receiver of the action to the subject that is taking the action, thus changing the meaning of the sentence.

On the second issue, the sentence could be clearer on what is meant. Perhaps this would make the meaning clear:

Once the user passes authentication and the first part of authorization, the <product name> Server logs the user into the client. (this makes it clear that the server is doing the action, not the user)

Or it could be written this way too:

Once the user passes authentication and the first part of authorization, the <product name> Server completes the login process. (thereby taking the user out of the issue alltogether).
The original [with my underline]:

'Once the user passes authentication and the first part of authorization, the user is logged in to the client.'

I find the underlined phrase very mysterious. It implies, but does not explain, that there is more than one part to the authorization process. Is there another part after the user is logged in to the client?

What would be wrong with this?-- Once the server authorizes the user, it logs in the user to the client.

Or-- Once the system authorizes the user, the servor logs in the user to the client.

Or-- Once the system/servor authenticates the use, the servor logs in the user to the client.

Yes, the second part of authorization is explained in my next sentence in this online help topic, but I have not included it because I do not find it relevant to the questions I am looking to get answered here. If you pretend that part is not in the sentence, the issues still remain the same.
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Hello Dawnie

I'm still not entirely clear about the process. Where you say "the <product name> Server logs the user into the client", is it into the client's system, or account, or a database, or – ?

Sorry to be pointy-headed...

(That's the real reason for the hat.)

MrP
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