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Hi,

One of the uses of 'will' is using it for expressing certainty and another use is predicting the future.There are sentence that seem to intersect,e.g.,'The sea level will rise in the future due to the greenhouse effect.'.

My question :Is a prediction certain?There seems to be a contradiction between certainty and prediction,the way I understand it?
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Hi,

One of the uses of 'will' is using it for expressing certainty and another use is predicting the future.There are sentence that seem to intersect,e.g.,'The sea level will rise in the future due to the greenhouse effect.'.

My question :Is a prediction certain?There seems to be a contradiction between certainty and prediction,the way I understand it?

I think this is perhaps a question more for philosophy than for grammar. In a sense, anything you say about the future can be considered uncertain, a prediction. eg The Sun will rise tomorrow. But maybe the world or the Universe will end tomorrow. Here in N. America, some people were certain that the world would end at 6 pm last Saturday. Their prediction was wrong.

Usually, the context will make the intended meaning clear. If not, we often start to say things like 'Are you sure?'

You might also want to ponder the future-oriented use of 'gioing to'.

Clive
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AnonymousThere are sentences that seem to intersect,e.g.,'The sea level will rise in the future due to the greenhouse effect.'.
True, but that's nothing to be concerned about. It's quite common to see a blend of meanings within any given usage.
AnonymousThere seems to be a contradiction between certainty and prediction,the way I understand it
That may be, but frankly, an example of 'will' expressing certainty doesn't easily come to mind. Nobody can be absolutely certain about anything in the future, can they? Do you have an example of this? I'm wondering what source you read that told you that 'will' expresses certainty. They must mean only relative certainty compared with other ways of stating things.

CJ