Hello. I've been having a discussion with my girlfriend (who studies English literature and French) about the effect of prefixes in the first part of a phrasal verb. I'd like to ask of your opinions. Say we have the phrasal verb "sign in". Would it not be wrong to write "resign in" when one wants to convey the meaning of signing in again? What I want to ask is whether one can arbitrarily put a prefix on the first part of a phrasal verb and have it affect the whole phrasal verb. I don't think it is allowed. Thank you for your feedback in advance.
Hello. I've been having a discussion with my girlfriend (who studies English literature and French) about the effect of prefixes ... have it affect the whole phrasal verb. I don't think it is allowed. Thank you for your feedback in advance.

'Resign' has its own meaning, to leave one's position. If you sign in, and leave, when you come back you 'sign in, again'. Joe
Hello. I've been having a discussion with my girlfriend (who ... it is allowed. Thank you for your feedback in advance.

'Resign' has its own meaning, to leave one's position. If you sign in, and leave, when you come back you 'sign in, again'.

But you can apply a prefix to a phrasal verb, and it does apply to the whole phrasal verb:
Pre-check-in procedure: what you have to do before you can "check in". re-sign-in: to "sign in" again
post-lift-off: occuring after "lift-off"
re-start-up: to "start-up" again.
Most are either technical or awkward, and in general, if you can re-write the sentence to avoid them, you should.
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But you can apply a prefix to a phrasal verb, and it does apply to the whole phrasal verb: Pre-check-in ... Most are either technical or awkward, and in general, if you can re-write the sentence to avoid them, you should.

Of the four you offer, the pre-check-in and post-lift-off seem right, not awkward.
I am reminded of the sign on a local gas station's pump, "please pre-pay first".
Joe
But you can apply a prefix to a phrasal verb, ... you can re-write the sentence to avoid them, you should.

Of the four you offer, the pre-check-in and post-lift-off seem right, not awkward.

I think that's because they're nouned away from their verbacity. As verbs "to postlift off" or "to precheck in" don't seem to mean much to me. I could just about accept "to re-sign in" or "to restart up", but we seem to agree they're both ugly and unnecessary.
I am reminded of the sign on a local gas station's pump, "please pre-pay first".

With using the cash money you've earlier pregotten from the ATM machine, no doubtless.

Mike.
I am reminded of the sign on a local gas station's pump, "please pre-pay first".

With using the cash money you've earlier pregotten from the ATM machine, no doubtless.

Ahem. That's the automated ATM machine, I believe...

Cheers, Harvey
CanEng and BrEng, indiscriminately mixed
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On 15 Jul 2008, Mike Lyle wrote

With using the cash money you've earlier pregotten from the ATM machine, no doubtless.

Ahem. That's the automated ATM machine, I believe...

You're very lucky. Because I live in such a rural area, mine are not automated at all, and I have to crank them to get the money out.
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