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Donna Richoux filted:
The way I see it, definition (1) is a larger class that also includes definition (2). What it says is, ... only other thing that comes to mind; that isn't right, either, but at least it carries the idea of favor.

"Predispostion"?...granted, it's officially more neutral than favorable, coinciding closely with definition (1), but I hear it used more in the favorable sense..r
Oh, no. As a guess, I'd say that Florida is right behind New York in any population ranking of Jews or Orthodox Jews.

Yeah, but the average age is probably about 75. Florida's where you go when you retire.

Evan Kirshenbaum + HP Laboratories >"Revolution" has many definitions.
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Biased? (Biased towards.)

Doesn't sound right. I'm not biased in favor of Jews. I'm not biased in favor of non-criminal Jews. I just can't mentally picture a lot of Orthodox Jews in Florida prisons. Give me another word.

It sounds like you have a (positive) stereotype.

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Looking up "prejudiced", though "2 a (1) : preconceived judgment or opinion (2) : an adverse opinion or leaning formed ... opposite of prejudice as defined above - that describes a preconceived opinion that is not adverse and not irrationally hostile?

How about "preconception"? M-W does not give any non-neutral connotation for this word.

Mike Nitabach
On 21 Jan 2004 08:44:24 -0800, Evan Kirshenbaum
Oh, no. As a guess, I'd say that Florida is right behind New York in any population ranking of Jews or Orthodox Jews.

Yeah, but the average age is probably about 75. Florida's where you go when you retire.

I think you're a bit behind times. Florida's population (2002) is 13,858312 of which 2,854,837 were over 65. That's 20.6% of the population. There are an estimated 750,000 Jews in Florida (date not given), so - if the Jews follow the average - there would be only be about 154,000 Jews in Florida over 65. (1)
Over two-thirds of the Jewish population in Florida resides in southern tip of Florida (if you exclude the Keys from the southern tip):
"The three-county South Florida area (Miami-Dade County, Broward County, and Palm Beach County) is home to 581,000 Jews, representing about 10% of American Jews. The South Florida Jewish community has the third largest concentration of Jews (after New York and southern California) in the country. 129,000 Jews live in Miami-Dade County, 234,000 live in Broward County, and 218,000 live in Palm Beach County. 6% of the Miami-Dade County population resides in Jewish households, as does 16% of the Broward County population and 20% of the Palm Beach County population. 12% of the South Florida population as a whole resides in Jewish households. Only the New York metropolitan area may have a larger percentage Jewish than South Florida."

Using the 2002 figures, California's over-65 population is 3,716,84 for .118 percent of the total population. You might conclude that Florida attracts more old people than California, or you might conclude that California's smoggy areas and freeways kill people younger.
(1) Most of them seem to sit on the porches of the buildings in Miami Beach kvetching that their son never visits.
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Yeah, but the average age is probably about 75. Florida's where you go when you retire.

I think you're a bit behind times. Florida's population (2002) is 13,858312 of which 2,854,837 were over 65. That's 20.6% ... if the Jews follow the average - there would be only be about 154,000 Jews in Florida over 65. (1)

Sure, but why assume that they follow the average? If people go there to retire, they're older when they get there and they don't have children once they're there, so they don't engender a younger population.

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On 21 Jan 2004 10:19:36 -0800, Evan Kirshenbaum
I think you're a bit behind times. Florida's population (2002) ... only be about 154,000 Jews in Florida over 65. (1)

Sure, but why assume that they follow the average? If people go there to retire, they're older when they get there and they don't have children once they're there, so they don't engender a younger population.

The word "if" in my sentence indicates that I do not necessarily assume that they follow the average. However, I don't really see Jews as being different than anyone else. Why would you assume that Jews are different and don't follow the average?
Is there some reason you think than younger Jews avoid Florida?
Biased? (Biased towards.)

Doesn't sound right. I'm not biased in favor of Jews. I'm not biased in favor of non-criminal Jews. I just can't mentally picture a lot of Orthodox Jews in Florida prisons. Give me another word.

Partial?
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Sure, but why assume that they follow the average? If ... once they're there, so they don't engender a younger population.

The word "if" in my sentence indicates that I do not necessarily assume that they follow the average. However, I don't really see Jews as being different than anyone else. Why would you assume that Jews are different and don't follow the average?

Because such a large percentage is due to migration as post-child- rearing adults rather than growing up there. Jews make up about 2% of the population worldwide, which would imply an expected Jewish population in Florida of about 276,000. This population would be expected to follow the demographics of the state. But the Jewish population you give is three times that, and I'd presume that the bulk of the rest is made up of older people who moved there when they retired.
Even if we assume that only half are retirees (hey, Florida's a nice place to live) and the rest were born there or moved while they still had (or had not yet had) youngish children, we'd expect 20% of the other half to be over 65 and over 90% of the retirees to be over 65. Which means a fair bit more than half the Jews in Florida would be over 65.
Is there some reason you think than younger Jews avoid Florida?

It's not that they avoid it, it's just that they're swamped by older Jews who come there to retire. Florida, and specifically Miami, has long been seen as the place to retire to for Jews in the Northeast and Midwest, where the largest populations are. I suspect that the younger Jewish population in Florida is higher than the national average, but it's nothing like 5.4% of the younger population.

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