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Doesn't sound right. I'm not biased in favor of Jews. ... of Orthodox Jews in Florida prisons. Give me another word.

Partial?

How about "keen (on)"?
You can see two examples of how it is properly used at the following address:

http://www.ananova.com/entertainment/story/sm 843515.html?menu=

The only problem with this question is that there is no word that indicates the kind of "positive prejudice" requested. Bias is bias is bias is bias, and the only reason that the term "positively prejudiced" exists is to indicate that one prejudice is not prejudice against, which is the standard connotation. To be prejudiced in favor of something or someone is to be inherently prejudiced against everything and everyone not that something or someone.

One must be either impartial or unbiased to be the opposite of prejudiced, biased, or partial.
My feeling about this little discussion is that the OP's unqualified statements are on almost the same level as "Some of my best friends are Jewish", and definitely on the same level as "Xs are/have Y". eg, "Black people have rythym", "Jews are more intelligent than other Americans", "Asians are better at math than Westerners", "Boys are smarter than girls", etc.

The statement exhibits at least an unconscious prejudice about religiously devout people, one that suggests that they are somehow more admirable and less immoral than those who are not religiously devout. I challenge that belief and suggest that it is nothing more or less than a typical stereotype

I want to know why it is that orthodox Jews ought to be exempt from an expectation that they would or would not be in Florida prisons in more or less than demographically proportional numbers. Orthodox religionists of all stripes are often religious and political fanatics and extremists, be they Jews, Muslims, Christians, Hindus, etc. I don't think that anything meaningful can be said about any of them.
Many people have claimed that America's prisons, and especially death rows, house a disprportionate number of blacks because the judicial system is inherently prejudiced in favor of whites and and against blacks. Why can't we make the same analogy and say that males are disproportionately represented in the same places simply because there are so many more males than females in prison?
I don't want to argue the truth or falsity of these statements or the analogy, but I would suggest that any such gross generalization needs some kind of qualifying explanation, one that the OP hasn't bothered to post, if I am not mistaken.
The only problem with this question is that there is no word that indicates the kind of "positive prejudice" requested. ... in favor of something or someone is to be inherently prejudiced against everything and everyone not that something or someone.

I beg to disagree, especially as "something" and "everything" are concerned (as opposed to "someone" or "everyone". For example, if' I'm partial to chocolate, or I prefer chocolate, it doesn't necessarly mean that I'm partial to everything. Some foods leave me completely "unbiased". I have some preferences, even strong likes or dislikes of literary styles, or schools of thought, musical genres etc, while others keep me very 'objective'. In other words, I'm not biased against everything. I can be very objective about things I don't care.
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Is there some reason you think than younger Jews avoid Florida?

It's not that they avoid it, it's just that they're swamped by older Jews who come there to retire. Florida, ... younger Jewish population in Florida is higher than the national average, but it's nothing like 5.4% of the younger population.

In 1978 my mother-in-law made her regular pilgrimage to visit her sister who had retired and moved from New York to Florida, to a place called Hollywood (which always confused people). Before her departure she asked our children what gifts they would like her to bring back. Our daughter had just started school and requested a lunch box (not common at that time in the UK). M-i-l returned some weeks later, empty handed (but with a great tan). Some of us were not entirely convinced by her assertion that there were no children - and thus no lunch boxes on sale - in Hollywood or its environs.
One of our administrators at work recently told me that she and her husband had been to Spain to look at properties with a view to retiring there but they had preferred the places they had seen last year in Florida, where you get more space for your money and everyone speaks English, so they would probably go there instead. I doubt whether they are trendsetters so I guess that a considerable influx of British retirees must be taking place.

Laura
(emulate St. George for email)
Maybe 'optimistic' might fit.

wrmst rgrds
Robin Bignall
Quiet part of Hertfordshire
England
Even if we assume that only half are retirees (hey, Florida's a nice place to live)

It is one of life's mysteries why so many people choose a hot, humid climate to retire to. Here in Australia, many old people choose to retire to Queensland. Later, many of them regret it when they realise just how humid it is, but they still go. If I were in America and had sufficient money to be able to choose, I'm sure I'd opt for somewhere like Southern California. I like warm, but it's got to be dry warm.

Rob Bannister
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
On 21 Jan 2004 12:21:12 -0800, Evan Kirshenbaum
The word "if" in my sentence indicates that I do ... assume that Jews are different and don't follow the average?

Because such a large percentage is due to migration as post-child- rearing adults rather than growing up there.

There is a middle group, you know. The during-child-rearing adults.
Jews make up about 2% of the population worldwide, which would imply an expected Jewish population in Florida of about ... I'd presume that the bulk of the rest is made up of older people who moved there when they retired.

So, we got all the Jews that would have made up the 2% in Montana, Utah, North Dakota, South Dakota, Wyoming, and Nebraska.
I dunno, Evan. I find it difficult to even work up an interest. It just seems that I see quite a few young, Jewish families.

How do I know they're Jewish? I drive by the JCC almost every afternoon.
How do I know they're Jewish? I drive by the JCC almost every afternoon.

I don't know how it is in Florida, but around here, that wouldn't be good evidence. My next door neighbour attends a Methodist church, sent her children to Catholic schools, and joined the JCC becuse they had the best swimming pool.

Frances Kemmish
Production Manager
East Coast Youth Ballet
www.byramartscenter.com
Wouldn't the propensity of Orthodox Jews to criminality yield to a Google on the population of Israeli Prisons?

John Dean
Oxford
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Doesn't sound right. I'm not biased in favor of Jews. ... of Orthodox Jews in Florida prisons. Give me another word.

Partial?

I read that, and did a double-take. For some reason, the only meaning of "partial" that came to mind was "part of something". I was figuratively scratching my head wondering what part of the word you were thinking of.
Then, "partial to.." came to mind.
So far, I like "predisposed" as in "I'm predisposed to think that not too many Orthodox Jews do jail time in Florida". It's a neutral enough word.
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