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I know about the others, but what is a Reconstructionist?

, .
Do we have them in Europe?

Apparently the only Reconstructionist community in Europe is in Prague. As a practical matter, the movement has few adherents outside the US. See .

I note a Reconstructionist congregation in Arlingon, Virginia, which uses the local Unitarian Church building, about three miles from where I live. Maybe I'll check them out.

Bob Lieblich
Modern Reform
(1) I'm not sure if only an Orthodox Jew keeps ... of determining the correct word with the sentence somehow rewritten.

Obaue: "Reform Jew". I know you're not interested, but Orthodox and most or all Conservative and Reconstructionist Jews keep kosher. Pretty much all Reform and secular or Secular Jews don't.

It's not that I'm not interested, but that this really isn't a factor in the question posed. It's interesting as a side issue, though.

I've never really understood the grades (?) of the Jewish faith. I understand Orthodox and Secular, but the in-betweens are a bit confusing. Reform(ed) implies a change from something to something. I've never heard of Reconstructionists. Orthodox and Conservative seem to mean the same thing.
If you care to give a brief run-down, I'd be interested.
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
... Obaue: "Reform Jew". I know you're not interested, but ... Pretty much all Reform and secular or Secular Jews don't.

It's not that I'm not interested, but that this really isn't a factor in the question posed. It's interesting as ... Orthodox and Conservative seem to mean the same thing. If you care to give a brief run-down, I'd be interested.

This is brief and omits details that explain reasons for the customs followed by each of the movements.
Reformed Judaism started in Germany late in the 19th Century. It became something quite different in the US by the middle of the last century with interpretations of laws and customs that were quite apart of the other movements.
The major distinctions between Orthodox, Conservative and movements other than Reformed have little to do with koshruth. They all embrace keeping kosher. They differ in what social customs are followed, how the holy days are celebrated (this includes the sabbath), and the interpretation of certain laws.
A difference between the various forms of Orthodox and the other movements of Judaism is the separation of the sexes during worship. This notion of segregation has been known to grow to the extreme where husbands are not seated with their wives at dinners. A major reason for the growth of the Conservative movement in the middle of the last century was the insistence that wives sit with their husbands during prayer. The most easily observed differences between Orthodox, Traditional and Conservative Judaism are seen in how they each define the status and roles of women.
These extreme interpretations are not something carried over from the old country. They have evolved recently. In this sense, the growth of religious extremism is step with what we have seen in the Christian and Moslem communities.
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}> I know about the others, but what is a Reconstructionist? }
} , . }
}> Do we have them in Europe?
}
} Apparently the only Reconstructionist community in Europe is in } Prague. As a practical matter, the movement has few adherents } outside the US. See . }
} I note a Reconstructionist congregation in Arlingon, Virginia, which } uses the local Unitarian Church building, about three miles from } where I live. Maybe I'll check them out.
There's one right here in Laurel proper: Oseh Shalom. Hang on a second and I'll see if I can rustle up a bulletin. Here it is. Okay, looking for a URL. Okay: http://www.oseh-shalom.org (Snail mail to Oseh Shalom,
7515 Olive Branch Way, Laurel, MD 20707 (at Van Dusen Road, if you'redriving)). Jewish Reconstructionist Federation.
They used to use our church for holy-day services before they built the big place they use now.

R. J. Valentine
I know you're not interested, but Orthodox and most or ... Pretty much all Reform and secular or Secular Jews don't.

It's not that I'm not interested, but that this really isn't a factor in the question posed. It's interesting as ... a change from something to something. I've never heard of Reconstructionists. Orthodox and Conservative seem to mean the same thing.

If you follow the secular news media, however, you will find little mention of Orthodox Jews. They don't exist, or at least are quite invisible to secular journalists.
There is an unwritten rule (actually it may even be written somewhere, in instructions to subs) that when referring to Jews, the word "orthodox" must always be preceded by "ultra".

Steve Hayes from Tshwane, South Africa
http://www.geocities.com/Athens/7734/stevesig.htm
E-mail - see web page, or parse: shayes at dunelm full stop org full stop uk
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
wrote, in part:
I've never really understood the grades (?) of the Jewish faith. I understand Orthodox and Secular, but the in-betweens are ... Orthodox and Conservative seem to mean the same thing. If you care to give a brief run-down, I'd be interested.

http://www.jewfaq.org/movement.htm
Michael Hamm Since mid-September of 2003, AM, Math, Wash. U. St. Louis I've been erasing too much UBE. (Email Removed) Of a reply, then, if you have been cheated, http://math.wustl.edu/~msh210/ Likely your mail's by mistake been deleted.
I've never really understood the grades (?) of the Jewish ... you care to give a brief run-down, I'd be interested.

http://www.jewfaq.org/movement.htm

The summary on this webpage may be accurate with regard to the US but I don't know how authoritative the percentage statistic is for the UK and the movement referred to is Masorti, not Masoreti. IME there are quite significant differences and nuances among how groups of Jews think of and describe themselves and the distinctions between UK Reform and UK Liberal are subtle in some respects.
Murray's summary is about right, especially with regard to the growth in Jewish "fundamentalism" which has been evident over the last 30 years or so in the UK.

Laura
(emulate St. George for email)
... Obaue: "Reform Jew". I know you're not interested, but ... Pretty much all Reform and secular or Secular Jews don't.

It's not that I'm not interested, but that this really isn't a factor in the question posed. It's interesting as a side issue, though. I've never really understood the grades (?) of the Jewish faith.

I've heard "branches" and "movements".
I understand Orthodox and Secular, but the in-betweens are a bit confusing. Reform(ed) implies a change from something to something. I've never heard of Reconstructionists. Orthodox and Conservative seem to mean the same thing. If you care to give a brief run-down, I'd be interested.[/nq]Briefly, Reform Jews supposedly believe in God and an afterlife, but emphasize the ethical component of Judaism and dispense with or relax most rituals, considering them obsolete. The Reform movement is of nineteenth-century German origin, and you can find influence from main-line Protestantism, though congregations vary. Conservative Jews (the movement is an off-shoot of Reform) keep a lot more of the traditional practices, such as kashrut, but don't worry about allowing iron to touch their faces and other things they see as minor.

Reconstructionists are a small minority of American Jews. They have a lot of latitude in belief rumor says they don't object to open atheism but emphasize community and ritual more than Reform Jews do. "Secular" can simply mean non-religious, or it can mean a specific movement that more or less rejects the supernatural and focuses on Jewish culture and on newly developed rituals. You can get a lot more information on the Web.

Jerry Friedman
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
(Email Removed) wrote, in part:
http://www.jewfaq.org/movement.htm

The summary on this webpage may be accurate with regard to the US but I don't know how authoritative the percentage statistic is for the UK

Me neither.
and the movement referred to is Masorti, not Masoreti.

I'm unfamiliar with it, but know some Hebrew, and imagine it's spelled mem-kamatz-gadol-samach-cholam-male-resh-sh'va-sav-chirik-yod. The sh'va would have to be a sh'va na, then, which I guess the jewfaq folks spell , as many people do.
Michael Hamm Since mid-September of 2003, AM, Math, Wash. U. St. Louis I've been erasing too much UBE. (Email Removed) Of a reply, then, if you have been cheated, http://math.wustl.edu/~msh210/ Likely your mail's by mistake been deleted.
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