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Hi,

Antonym of belated, therefore it is early.

This word is used when someone declares "my birthday is tomorrow", the listener replies "happy prelated birthday"

Is it correct?

Thanks.
Comments  
>Antonym of belated, therefore it is early.

Not in my dictionary, and sounds strange. Just in jokes, perhaps, and the other person would definitely have a double-take.
I'm not aware of this word either and it is not in my dictionary.

Where did you find it?

Ah, I see you are from India. It could easily be an Indian English word not recognised elsewhere (similar to preponed as the opposite of postponed, this only exists in Indian English, and seems to be a similar formation). In that case, I suppose you could use it when you were talking to an Indian English speaker, but don't use it with anyone else as they won't understand you.
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Apparently, somebody made up this word for fun!

You'll find it here http://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=prelated together with Simi's example, and you'll find it also in a few blogs (it usually goes with "birthday"). It seems to be spreading.
I had the exact same thought as Nona - prepone being the first Indian English word I have encountered, it immediately came to mind when I read "prelated." Same logic seems to apply. (Although what I'd say is "Happy birthday in advance.")

(By the say, my Indian collegue changed a meeting time and sent out an announcement about it be preponed. It made me smile because I knew if I'd not been coming here, I would have been a little puzzled by it at first. Instead, I knew exactly what she meant as soon as I read it.)
SimiHi,

Antonym of belated, therefore it is early.

This word is used when someone declares "my birthday is tomorrow", the listener replies "happy prelated birthday"

Is it correct?

Thanks.
Similar to the "prebuttal" of the Presidnt's State of the Union Address......everyone knew what he was going to say, so the "rebuttal" came first. This is probably the way it's going to be. Not sure about "prelated", which is new to me.
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TanitApparently, somebody made up this word for fun!

You'll find it here http://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=prelated together with Simi's example, and you'll find it also in a few blogs (it usually goes with "birthday").

Actually, yes! I did come across this word at the site mentioned above and just wanted to confirm if it were correct. It's not like in India we use this word.
Simi
Tanit
Apparently, somebody made up this word for fun!

You'll find it here http://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=prelated together with Simi's example, and you'll find it also in a few blogs (it usually goes with "birthday").

Actually, yes! I did come across this word at the site mentioned above and just wanted to confirm if it were correct. It's not like in India we use this word.
I think it's quite a "stretch". Look at the components of the original word: be-late. "pre-late" doesn't work. it's a cute idea, one that I think will not catch on.
Unfortunately this is not correct, I assume you found the word prelated on the urban dictionary which is a site that feature made up slang words. Prelated refers to the word prelate which is defined as "a bishop or other high ecclesiastical dignitary". Question closed
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