Do you use premises in the singular form? Could you give a couple of examples?
Thanks in advance!
Veteran Member7,658
Hi New2grammar

"premise' and 'premises' are different in meaning. The following clearly defines both words.

No smoking on these premises. (NOT No smoking on this premise.)
premise Show phonetics
noun [C]
an idea or theory on which a statement or action is based:
[+ that] They had started with the premise that all men are created equal.
The research project is based on the premise stated earlier.

premises Show phonetics
plural noun
the land and buildings owned by someone, especially by a company or organization:
The company is relocating to new premises.
There is no smoking allowed anywhere on school premises.
The ice cream is made on the premises (= in the building where it is sold).
The security guards escorted the protesters off (= away from) the premises.
Veteran Member8,073
I can't belive they are different. I thought it was like the private parts case. Thanks, Yoong Liat. It's all clear now.
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New2grammar
I can't belive they are different. I thought it was like the private parts case. Thanks, Yoong Liat. It's all clear now.

By the way, 'belive' should be spelled 'believe'. I have highlighted 'lie'. This is to help you remember the spelling of the word. I believe you. You are not telling me a lie.

If it is a typo, ignore what I've written.
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