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There's a question which demands finding out a number which has error and the answer is ①. They say ① is answer because there should be a "preparatory it", that is, "make it possible."

➤ Your generosity helps ①make possiblefor us to continueoffering our students ④free education, educational materials, and opportunities ⑤for developing personality.

I understand that it should be much better if we insert it between make and possible. But can this be the case without exception? Personally I think the above question is too much for the English learner as a second language.

Because I sometimes see there is no "preparatory it" but the sentence is still good sentence like below sentence.

1➊ I've taken it into account that boredom pays off.

2➋ I've taken into ACCOUNT that you maybe previously engaged; if so, I'll WITHDRAW my offer and hope for Saturday.

In number 1➊ there is "preparatory it" while in number 2➋ there is no "preparatory it" and still right sentence.

Can you give me a fresh idea over this problem?
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Not sure about this - it may be more complicated.

The examples here are based on the verbs, make and take, which both require direct objects. It seems like the "it" is required when another suitable object is absent.

Your generosity helps make possible for us to continue - I'm having trouble finding the object. We need the "it."

Your generosity helps make possible a better life for our students - here I see "life" as the object. You don't need the "it." In fact, "it" would be incorrect. Maybe I'm wrong.

I take seriously that you may have pneumonia. The whole "that clause" is the object of "take." But in this case you may optionally add the "it." I don't know why.
Thanks for your answer.

But I think I don't still get it.

I asked

1. Your generosity helps ①make possiblefor us to continueoffering our students ④free education, educational materials, and opportunities ⑤for developing personality.

Is the above sentence absolutely wrong without preparatory it between "make" and "possible"?

2.

If so, how come the below sentence possible without preparatory it?

(I've taken into ACCOUNT that you maybe previously engaged; if so, I'll WITHDRAW my offer and hope for Saturday.)

And I showed another example sentence of using preparatory, that is, "I've taken it into account that boredom pays off."
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I honestly don't know very much about "absolutely wrong" anymore. My answer was that there are cases where it's clearly optional (sounds equally good with or without) like your "previously engaged" and "boredom" examples. There are cases where the "it" absolutely sounds wrong. And there are cases where the vast majority of people would use the "it," like your "generosity" example. But I can give you examples of usages practiced by the majority of "native speakers" and rejected by the majority of grammar authorities. What does that mean? I'll be happy to tell you that I don't think your "generosity" example is absolutely wrong without the "it," but you should collect more opinions to be "absolutely" sure.
Thanks, Avangi.

Waiting for your answer, I checked out Cambridge Dictionary.

There's good example sentences to help solve the 'it' problem.

That is,



  1. A good architect takes into account the building's surroundings.




  2. I hope my teacher will take into account the fact that I was ill just before the exams when she marks my paper.



  3. I think you have to take into account that he's a good deal younger than the rest of us.

In #1 sentence I realized that 'take into accout' can be used like 'phrasal verb.'

So we cannot apply the same rigid rule -make it possible- to this expression.

What do you think of my thought?
Hi Stenka,

I'd say none of these require(s) the "it." In 1 & 2 you must not use it. In 3 you may use it (it's optional.) What does Cambridge say about it?

I need some sleep before commenting on your "phrasal verb" idea. Sorry. I don't have a set of formulae in hand yet which can handle all cases.

Best regards, - A.
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Thanks, Avangi.

Sorry if I was taking your sound sleep away.

Actually Cambridge say nothing about 'optional.'

In the phrase title, 'take account of' & 'take into account,' there were just three example sentences.

Thanks for you giving me a big help.

Thanks again and I hope you have a sound sleep.