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Hi

I have a question with this sentence.

He made his escape by jumping ______ a window and jumping ______ a waiting car.

a. over / into b. between / into c. out of / between d. out of / into e. up to / out of

I think option d is correct. But, I would like to know if there can be a context that makes option a (over/into) the most suitable option.

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It is unlikely that a stray window that he had to jump over would be lying on the route to his car.

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vsureshI would like to know if there can be a context that makes option a (over/into) the most suitable option.

I can't think of any contexts like that — except the most bizarre ones, to wit:

Workmen were about to install a window in a house. The window and its frame were taken out of the delivery truck and placed on the ground in preparation for the installment. The window was lying horizontally on the ground. "He" escaped by jumping over the window and into a car.


You could say that he jumped over the window sill, but in that situation it would be more appropriate to say he jumped through the window.

Here's a picture of a window with a plant on the window sill.

CJ

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Comments  

Thank you, fivejedjon.

I understand your point.

I am visualizing a situation where the robber had parked his car close the window.

Probably just as he was in the living room and was about to lay his hands on the thing he wanted to steal, he heard someone coming. Then he escaped jumping over the window, which he was the quickest way out.

Please give your views.

 CalifJim's reply was promoted to an answer.
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Thank you very much, CJ.

I understand.

CalifJim that situation it would be more appropriate to say he jumped through the window

And, in the given sentence do you prefer "through" in place of "out of"?

I think "out of" seems appropriate when the act is not done in desperation.

Example1

What did your husband do when he could not open the door from inside?

It didn't cause him any trouble. He jumped out of the window and walked off...

Example 2

How did the thief manage to escape after you had shut and locked the doors?

He jumped through the window.


CJ, is my understanding of them correct?

Please give your views.

vsureshin the given sentence do you prefer "through" in place of "out of"?

No, not at all. Either is fine. It's just that "through" wasn't one of the choices, so I didn't comment on it further.

vsureshI think "out of" seems appropriate when the act is not done in desperation.

Personally, I have no feelings one way or the other on this. Both "out of" and "through" are simply abstract relationships in space for me. I don't associate either of them with any kind of dire circumstances or with desperation.

I would readily use either "out of" or "through" in either of your two example sentences.

CJ

I understand.

Thank you, CJ.

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vsuresh

Hi

I have a question with this sentence.

He made his escape by jumping ______ a window and jumping ______ a waiting car.

a. over / into b. between / into c. out of / between d. out of / into e. up to / out of

I think option d is correct. But, I would like to know if there can be a context that makes option a (over/into) the most suitable option.

Please don't add posts that contain nothing but a quotation of the original question. It adds nothing to the discussion to ask the same thing again, especially when the answer has already been given.

Thread locked.

CJ