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Where can I find the list of such verbs?

I need something like those:
to expect of someone
to depend on something
...
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Comments  
Buy
Spears, Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

Also see the Phrasal Verb section here:
Emotion: winkWhen I hear "preposition-dependent", I think of something like an addiction. I've always used the term "two-word verbs" for such things. That way, you can't be accused of ending a sentence with a preposition.

Turn on: 'he turned on the radio' and 'he turned the radio on' are both correct.

Look up to: 'He is a person that everyone looks up to' is ever so much better than 'he is a person up to whom everyone looks'.
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Marius HancuBuy
Spears, Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs
I've found McGraw-Hill's Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. Is that also OK? I can send it to you in pdf format for you to take a look at.
I don't think the original poster was referring to phrasal verbs (or two-word verbs) when he wrote about preposition-dependent verbs. These are two different things, far as I know.

CJ
Selecter I've found McGraw-Hill's Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. Is that also OK? I can send it to you in pdf format for you to take a look at.
It's the same, it's by Spears.
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CalifJimI don't think the original poster was referring to phrasal verbs (or two-word verbs) when he wrote about preposition-dependent verbs. These are two different things, far as I know.

CJ

Yes, I was referring to the verbs which are used only with certain prepositions (like depend on/upon). Although Marius' recommendation helped me to find a book with an imposing list of phrasal verbs with examples.

Preposition-Dependent verbs: http://sk.com.br/sk-pdv.html
Thank you, Marius. It's really a good book.
CalifJimI don't think the original poster was referring to phrasal verbs (or two-word verbs) when he wrote about preposition-dependent verbs. These are two different things, far as I know.

CJ

Hi CJ,

What is the difference? They seem to be the same for me.

Would you explain?
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