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"The '99 Problems' rapper is set to pen an autobiography in which he will open up about his life with wife Beyonce Knowles, despite the pair making a pact to not speak about their relationship publicly."

Is this in really necessary in this sentence?

I honestly can't seem to figure out the rule for using by, for, to etc. with which. i.e. by which, for which, to which etc etc etc.

The one that I see most frequently is 'in which'.

Please HELP.

really desperate here!! why can't 'which' just stand alone? why the need to use 'in' 'to' 'for' etc. in front of 'which' ?
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lerevewhy can't 'which' just stand alone? why the need to use 'in' 'to' 'for' etc. in front of 'which' ?
This is one of the simple and logical things in English grammar. Emotion: smile A preposition is needed with a relative pronoun for exactly the same reason it is needed withnouns and verbs. For example, you cannot say:

He lives this house.

Live can't take a direct object (house), so a preposition is needed:
He lives in this house.
The same preposition is used with a relative pronoun that refers to house:
This is the house in which he lives. Also:
This is the house [which/that] he lives in.

Another example, this time with a verb. Wait as a verb often requires for:
I waited for him.
Therefore, if wait occurs in a relative clause, for is needed too:
Is he the man for whom you waited so long? Or:
Is he the man [whom/who/that] you waited for so long?

If you are not familiar with relative pronouns, use the search box in the top right corner to learn more about them.

CB
Comments  
lereveIs this in really necessary in this sentence?
Yes. He will describe his life in an autobiography. Being constructed this way:
lereve"The '99 Problems' rapper is set to pen an autobiography which he will open up about his life with wife Beyonce Knowles, despite the pair making a pact to not speak about their relationship publicly."
It doesn't make any sense. You can use where instead.
lereveI honestly can't seem to figure out the rule for using by, for, to etc. with which. i.e. by which, for which, to which etc etc etc.
There is no universal rule. Articles and prepositions are one of the most difficult part of English Grammar. Try learning them in Grammar Book you're using. Check good dictionaries and read a lot.
lerevewhy can't 'which' just stand alone? why the need to use 'in' 'to' 'for' etc. in front of 'which' ?
Because which is used while referring to something previously mentioned when introducing a clause giving further information is generally used.

I can't find the book which can help pass the exam.
Which shirt do you prefer - green or indigotic?
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
 Cool Breeze's reply was promoted to an answer.
Great answer, CB. [Y]