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Dear native teachers,

I've learnt since the beginning that we must use "in" when referring to countries like: "I live in France" or "This was made in Japan". But, I was surprised when I saw a headline on the Independent on Sunday magazine that read:

« Made in Japan, Sold on Britain.»

The article is about Life of Japanese people in Britain.

I'm waiting for your explanations on the use of "on" with "Britain" after "sold".

ThanX a lot in advance for your help.

Cheers!

Emotion: geeked
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renan torres-riveroI'm waiting for your explanations on the use of "on" with "Britain" after "sold".
It's a play on words. It's about how people who were born in Japan ("made" in Japan) live and work happily in Britain (they are "sold on" that is "happy with" Britain).

Note that "sold on" is a phrasal verb in this context.
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If so, I mean if it is a phrasal verb, then, shouldn't it be expressed like this: "Made in Japan, Sold on in Britain"?
AnonymousIf so, I mean if it is a phrasal verb, then, shouldn't it be expressed like this: "Made in Japan, Sold on in Britain"?

No. Have you looked up "sold on"?
You're right!

The Oxford Advance says:

be 'sold on sth(informal):> to be very enthusiastic about sth

Thank you very much!

Cheers!

;-)
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
So England here is "something".

IT's strange, isn't it?