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What do you think of these sentences?

Despite his saying he would not go, he went.
Despite his own saying he would not go, he went.
Despite himself saying he would not go, he went.

I can say: His (own) saying that he would not go didn't keep him from going.
But can I say grammatically: Himself saying he would not go did not keep him from going?

In view of this, shouldn't we consider the third despite sentence ill-formed?
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electrumWhat do you think of these sentences?

Despite his saying he would not go, he went.
Despite his own saying he would not go, he went.
Despite himself saying he would not go, he went.
Only the first can be used. The other two are incorrect.
electrumI can say: His (own) saying that he would not go didn't keep him from going.
But can I say grammatically: Himself saying he would not go did not keep him from going?
No. You can't say the second one.

CJ
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Despite himself saying is from Obama's utternaces.

Here's one I found on line:
I go to sleep with that guy on the DVD player and so him saying that was like the biggest compliment ever.

What I'm gettinmg at though is this. Compare:
With John's pleading guilty, he was given a light sentence.
I cannot concentrate with John standing over me.

It somehow seems wrong to say with John's standing over me, but I'm trying to pinpoint the difference.
Despite himself saying is from Obama's utterances.

Here's one I found online:

I go to sleep with that guy on the DVD player and so him saying that was like the biggest compliment ever.

What I'm getting at though is the difference between these sentences:
With John's pleading guilty, he was given a light sentence.
I can't concentrate with John pleading and sobbing like that.

They were hard pressed with John living at home.

In the second and third sentences, John's seems inappropriate.
electrumDespite himself saying is from Obama's utterances.
Yes? What is the significance of its being uttered by Obama? I don't understand your point.
electrumWhat I'm getting at though is the difference between these sentences:
With John's pleading guilty, he was given a light sentence.
I can't concentrate with John pleading and sobbing like that.
They were hard pressed with John living at home.

In the second and third sentences, John's seems inappropriate.
I have the same impression.

CJ
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CalifJim
electrumDespite himself saying is from Obama's utterances.
Yes? What is the significance of its being uttered by Obama? I don't understand your point.
I was merely surprised that a lawyer and poltician with advanced college degrees would make what seemed to me such an obvious blunder. Of course, if he made it in an extemporaneous statement, I can understand that he might have gotten tongue-tied.