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Hello Teachers,

1.This is the train ------ I came.(by which).

2.The people ----------- I live are pleasant.(with whom).

3.The children ----- you spoke are learning grammar.(to whom).

4.This is the car -------- I told you.(about which).

5.The char --------- you sat has just been painted. (on which).

6.The purse ---------- she kept her money is lost.(in which).

7.This car ---------- I paid a lot of money, is now out of dated.(for which).

My choices are in the bracket. Are they correct?

Thanks.
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Hello Teachers,

1.This is the train ------ I came.(by which). on which

'by' is used to discuss general transportation. It isn't normally used to discuss a specific piece of transport.

I came by car.

*I came by my car.*

2.The people ----------- I live are pleasant. (with whom). OK

3.The children ----- you spoke are learning grammar. (to whom) OK

4.This is the car -------- I told you. (about which). OK

5.The chaIr --------- you sat has just been painted. (on which). OK

6.The purse ---------- she kept her money is lost. (in which) OK

7.This car ---------- I paid a lot of money, is now old fashioned (out of date[d]). (for which) OK

H:
My choices are in [the] bracketS. Are they correct?

JTT: Generally, yes they are, Hanuman. But you should be aware that some of these would sound overly stuffy if used in casual speech. This fronted preposition style tends to be used in higher register situations.
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Yes they do sound rather old fashioned and stuffy - I wouldn't say that many people use this type of construction in speech.
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
Comments  
Thank you for helping out with these grammar questions, JTT!Emotion: big smile
My pleasure, Julie.Emotion: smile
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
 nona the brit's reply was promoted to an answer.
The entire point of being able to write in different registers is to be able to apply the correct one to a given situation. There is a time and place for even the most formal language.