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Hello,

If I have to change the indirect object of the following sentence into a prepositional phrase:

"Peter sent Mary some flowers."

Should I use 'to' as in "Peter sent some flowers to Mary",

or 'for' as in "Peter sent some flowers for Mary"?

I came across some course materials showing sentences using 'for' but I suspect it is wrong and instead the correct sentence should be using 'to'.

Greatly appreciate if anyone can be kind to provide clarification.

Thank you.

Best regards,

Thomas
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Hello, salsatom - and welcome to English Forums.

Should I use 'to' as in "Peter sent some flowers to Mary" -- This is the appropriate conversion for your indirect object.

or 'for' as in "Peter sent some flowers for Mary"?-- This is of course good grammar, too, but the flowers are not necessarily delivered to Mary; they may travel to her via a 3rd party.
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Thank you Mister Micawber.

But then I have a further question.

Is that 'for Mary' in my original question equal to the 'for Mary' in the following sentence?

"Peter sent some flowers to Mary's sister for Mary."

I hope I have not misunderstood your meaning of 'via a third party'.

Best regards,

Thomas
You have understood perfectly, Thomas.
Hello,

However if that is correct, the phrase 'for Mary' in the sentence cannot be understood as the indirect object in the original sentence. Instead, the phrase 'to Mary's sister' is the indirect object of the sentence below:

"Peter sent Mary's sister some flowers (for Mary)."

So after all, if I straightly want to replace the indirect object in my original sentence which is

"Peter sent Mary some flowers."

the only way seems to be using the phrase 'to Mary' instead of 'for Mary' if we don't want to alter the exact meaning.

Please correct me if I am wrong. I would really love to clarify some concept.

Thank you.

Best regards,

Thomas
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That is what I said in my first post, Thomas.