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Hello, 

I've noticed that the phrases "back at work" and "back to work" are often used interchangeably. I supposes the correct usage depends on the context of the sentence, and I was wondering if someone will be willing to explain what is the difference and when it is appropriate to use at or to. 

For example, what should I use in the following sentences.

1. I am planning to be back at work on Monday.

or

2. I am planning to be to work on Monday.  

Thanks fo your help! 

Prepositions could be very confusing!
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It's 'be at work' or 'go to work'.

Therefore:

I am planning to be back at work on Monday.

I am planning to go back to work on Monday.

Rover
Comments  
These are similar but not interchangeable. For example:

"I'm going back to work on Monday." This is correct. The person might have been on sick leave for a while and is going back to work. Note: you cannot substitute "back at work" for "back to work" in this sentence.

The example you gave, "I'm planning to be back at work on Monday.", is correct. Again, the person might have been on leave and is going back to work on Mon. Substituting "back to work" in this sentence, so that you have, "I'm planning to be back to work on Monday.", is not quite right usage. You cannot interchange these phrases.

Some examples of correct usage of these phrases - as a rough guide to usage, the "to" generally implies movement, going back to work; the "at" generally implies a stationary position, "He's back at work.":

I'll be back at work on Mon.

The vacation's over and it's back to work on Mon.

Bill's recovered from his knee injury and is back at work now.

The doctor says I'm fully recovered and can go back to work.