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http://www.englishclub.com/grammar/prepositions-at-in-on-place.htm

I'm confused with the preposition at, on ,in.

In(1) the above link on second table, Why it's "on a bus" and not 'in a bus'. In the 'in' row "in a car", they are both automobile but used different proposition. I think bus is an enclosed space so shouldn't it be 'in' ?

(1) What should i use at/in/on ?

I ask other question and people posted answer, but on the top "This question is Not Answered.".
Is there some way to mark as answered or i can just leave it like that?
Comments  
eblitoI'm confused by the prepositions at, on ,in. In(1) the above link on second table, Why it's "on a bus" and not 'in a bus'. In the 'in' row "in a car", they are both automobiles but the use different propositions. I think a bus is an enclosed space so shouldn't it be 'in' ?
When you get on a bus, you step through a doorway, pay for the ticket and walk to your seat.
Usually, we use "on" for vehicles where you can walk to your seat.

We get on a ferry, get on a bus, get on a train, get on a plane, get on a subway and get on a bicycle.
Once you are in your seat, we can say you are in the bus, in the train compartment, etc. But normally, we just use the same preposition - on.
Where is he? He is on bus 14.

On the other hand, when you cannot walk to your seat, but just sit down from outside, we use "in."
Thus you get in a car.
eblitoI asked another question and people posted answers, but on the top it says "This question is Not Answered.".
Is there some way to mark as answered or i can just leave it like that?
Just leave it like that.
The moderators like to keep a question open to invite more opinions or answers. When the moderators think it is finally answered, they can close the thread or mark it "answered."
Thank you, i guess you saw my signature.
You boldfaced the correct way really make it easier for me.
AlpheccaStarsbut the use of different propositions.
When i repeat the sentence above without of, it sounds awkward to me. Does it sound right to you if i add of ?
AlpheccaStarsI asked another question
I thought the word another means more of something like
I have one plate, can i have another plate. While other will be something different.
Here is something i found on the net.
Another is an adjective and written as one word meaning: additional as in : I'd like another example please.

Other is also an adjective meaning: different/alternative/not the same and can be used with the definite article as in: Let me show you the other photographs I took last year.
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
eblitoIn(1) the above link on second table, Why it's "on a bus" and not 'in a bus'. In the 'in' row "in a car", they are both automobile but used different proposition. I think bus is an enclosed space so shouldn't it be 'in' ?
Many of these expressions should be memorized as full phrases rather than trying to find a rationale for the choice of preposition.

Nevertheless, you might use a guide like Alphecca has given with regard to means of transport.

Here are some further tips.

We ride on an animal, so we say
on the [horse / pony / camel / elephant]

And by analogy with the way we ride on an animal, straddling it, we say

on the [bicycle / tricycle / moped / motorbike / motorcycle]

If you walk up some steps to enter a vehicle that normally carries multiple members of the public who pay a fare, you get on. It doesn't matter that these may be enclosed spaces.

on the [bus / ship / plane / train / ferry]

Otherwise, if you use a vehicle with limited space, not normally used to carry many members of the public at once, you get in.
in the [car / taxi / limousine / station wagon / SUV / truck]

Depending on its purpose, you can have both in the boat (small, private) and on the boat (big public ferry), in the helicopter (small) and on the helicopter (army helicopter for transporting troops), in the plane (small, private plane) and on the plane (for commercial flights).

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eblito(1) What should i use at/in/on ?
In the link above ...

CJ
eblito
AlpheccaStarsbut the use of different propositions.
When i repeat the sentence above without of, it sounds awkward to me. Does it sound right to you if i add of ?
Hi;

Here was your original sentence:

Why it's "on a bus" and not 'in a bus'. In the 'in' row "in a car", they are both automobile but used different proposition. I think bus is an enclosed space so shouldn't it be 'in' ?

Here it is fully corrected (My first correction was not quite right):

Why is it "on a bus" and not 'in a bus'? (You can't use "it's" because the contraction is not the correct inverted word order for questions.)

In the 'in' row "in a car", both columns refer to automobiles, but they list different prepositions. I think that a bus is an enclosed space so shouldn't the preposition be 'in' ? (You used the pronouns, it and they. You have to use these so that the antecedent is clear.)

eblito
AlpheccaStarsI asked another question
I thought the word another means more of something like
I have one plate, can i have another plate. While other will be something different.
Here is something i found on the net.
Another is an adjective and written as one word meaning: additional as in : I'd like another example please.
Other is also an adjective meaning: different/alternative/not the same and can be used with the definite article as in: Let me show you the other photographs I took last year.


Another literally comes from "one other."
Let me show you the other photographs I took last year. (plural)
Let me show you another (one other) photograph I took last year. (singular)

Here is what you wrote. It is not natural:

I ask other question and people posted answer.

Here is one correction:
I asked another question and people posted answers. (Meaning a different question.)

But usually "another" is used in the context of "one more," so this is not a usual way of saying this. Instead, you should write this:
Earlier, I asked a question and people posted answers.

You will hear this a lot informally:

I asked this other question and people posted answers.
CJ thank you for your further explanation and comfired i used the correct preposition.

Now i know the usage of in and on. In additional, the difference between other and another.
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So, following that rule it would be right to say: get in the bike/horse? But actually the right way to say that is: get on the bike/horse.. could you explain that to me, please? Thanks
There is no rule to suggest it would be 'get in a bike/horse'. Where did you get that idea? Have you read the posts in this thread?