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Prepositions.

I saw the house in which he lived.

Could this be seen as the object of the preposition, rather than a relative clause?

Is this the only instance where a preposition can either precede or follow its object? *

*I ask because I want to know if there may be times where I cannot move the preposition away from the end of the sentence. That is, if there is no relative pronoun (including reduced relative clauses where there is an omitted pronoun), where would the preposition go if I don't want to end the sentence with a preposition?

Thanks
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English 1b3I saw the house in which he lived.

Could this be seen as the object of the preposition, rather than a relative clause?
Absolutely not.
English 1b3Is this the only instance where a preposition can either precede or follow its object?
No. Didn't we go through this already in another thread? Consider questions.

In which house did he live? / Which house did he live in?
To what do we owe this honor? / What do we owe this honor to?
With what will we cut the bread? / What will we cut the bread with?

CJ
Sorry, i forgot to include when asking questions.

Is there any other case? If there is, where would the preposition go, since there is no pronoun to put it before and since there is no question to place it infront of?

'of' here is probably just part of the verb, as you mentioned in the other post.

Ta
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English 1b3Is there any other case?
I can't think of one. That doesn't mean there isn't one!
English 1b3there is no question to place it infront of?

'of' here is probably just part of the verb, as you mentioned in the other post.
Really? Which post? I don't believe ofis ever part of a verb, so I wonder why I said that. Emotion: smile

CJ
I can't find the post Emotion: sad

But didn't you speak of prepositions that have to stick with the verb (sorry, not part of the verb phrase).

Isn't this an example of one?
English 1b3didn't you speak of prepositions that have to stick with the verb
Oh! I remember. That was about phrasal verbs. Phrasal verbs consist of a main verb and an adverbial particle like in, out, on, off, up, and down. "Adverbial particle" -- not "preposition" -- though it may look like a preposition. The "prepositions that have to stick with the verb" are actually not true prepositions. They're "particles". That's why they "have to stick with the verb".

throw out, put up, take down, look up, bring up, slow down, find out, ... are phrasal verbs.

I don't think there are any phrasal verbs which have the adverbial particle of, though there may be a rare few that escape me just now.

CJ
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
since there is no question to place it infront of.

Where else can the preposition go then?
English 1b3Where else can the preposition go then?
I assume you mean to ask "Where else besides the end can the preposition of be placed in the clause
since there is no question to place it in front of ?

Answer: You can put it here if you want more formal style:

since there is no question in front of which to place it.

CJ
since there is no question in front of which to place it.

Thanks!

So it could also be:

since there is no question which to place it infront of.

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This confuses me, since relative clauses usually use a finite verb, but this one has an infinitive...

If it were this, i would understand it:

since there is no question, which I can place it infront of.

since there is no question, infront of which I can place it.

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What does the infinitive function as then?

Can you please help me get my head around this relative clause, please. That way, I can locate the omitted which in similar sentences, so that I can move the preposition before the pronoun.
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