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Hi,
I already asked about this, apparently I didn't understand or got no answer. Here:

There's a guy who's trying to run through a wall of flames with his bicycle, completely naked. He starts, he passes through the flames, he succeeds. Everyone applaudes. After a few minutes, after he get dressed, I go congratulate him. What should I say?

Congratulation man, that was great! [I've/I'd] never seen [someone/anyone] doing that completely naked!

I need some advice on the possible ways to say that. Thanks Emotion: smile
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KooyeenHi,
I already asked about this, apparently I didn't understand or got no answer. Here:

There's a guy who's trying to run through a wall of flames with his bicycle, completely naked. He starts, he passes through the flames, he succeeds. Everyone applaudes. After a few minutes, after he get dressed, I go congratulate him. What should I say?

Congratulations man, that was great! [I've/I'd] never seen [someone/anyone] do that completely naked!

I need some advice on the possible ways to say that. Thanks Emotion: smile

Many would use the present perfect because of the closeness of the time of the action. Technically speaking, however, I think the past perfect is more correct.

['anyone' because of the preceding negative 'never']

[for some reason, 'congratulations' is generally used in the plural]
All possible. Different meanings.
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Someone is legitimate too, but different meaning from anyone:

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I have only read about it in the papers but I have never seen someone doing things like that. "I don't accept things like that. It is not good. ...
... that was great! places the action in the past. The establishment of a viewpoint in the past means that the present perfect is going to clash. Say I'd never seen.

As for the other choices, I'd say ... seen anyone do that ...
anyone just because it's the more usual form with a negative (never), and do instead of doing because it refers to the event as a whole (the same way the event has already been referred to in the word that earlier), not to the event as it was unfolding.

CJ
Thank you.
Philip Many would use the present perfect because of the closeness of the time of the action. Technically speaking, however, I think the past perfect is more correct.
My problem is always the same: I don't know when the present perfect should be replaced with the past perfect, what "triggers" the past perfect...
For example, if I'm watching a baseball game for the first time (there's virtually no baseball in Italy), I say "Wow, I like it! I've never seen a baseball game," even though I'm still watching it, and I've been watching it for a while (so in theory I have actually seen it, because I've been watching for a while already).
But when does that present perfect become a past perfect? ("I liked it. I'd never seen a baseball game")When the game is over? In the same way, in my previous example, how do I choose between a present and past perfect?
Thanks again in advance. Emotion: smile
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Oooops, I didn't see your post Jim!
I understand... at least it's clearer than before! Thank you so much. Emotion: smile
Kooyeen, the "present perfect" is used when the state (perceived or actual) caused by a past action continues to the present time. The moment you saw you friend perform the stunt that continuum of state was broken hence the need for the "past perfect".

I had never seen anyone doing that completely naked (until I saw you do it)!

Isn't it similar in Italian?
BokehI had never seen anyone doing that completely naked (until I saw you do it)!

Isn't it similar in Italian?
Yes! But I can't rely on Italian, we use the past perfect on many occasions... There are a lot of things that are similar to English, but also a lot of exceptions. Emotion: smile
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