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Dear teachers,

I found the following sentences in my textbook:

More and more accidents are being caused by drunk drivers every year.

Health and nutrition issues are being valued highly these days.

  1. Why are the present continous passive tense used here?

  2. Can I just say " are caused " because the first sentence seems to me a permanent truth and is occurred year after year?

  3. Can I just say " have been valued " for the second sentence because I saw " these days " in this sentence?
Please advise,

LCChang
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Hi,

More and more accidents are being caused by drunk drivers every year.

Health and nutrition issues are being valued highly these days.

  1. Why is the present continous passive tense used here? The writer uses the passive to put the major emphasis on 'more and more accidents', and less on the 'drunk drivers'. The continuous stresses that this is happening all the time.
  2. Can I just say " are caused " because the first sentence seems to me a permanent truth and is occurred year after year? It's not exactly a permanent truth, there were no such accidents before cars were invented. However, you could say 'are caused' without a big change in meaning.
  3. Can I just say " have been valued " for the second sentence because I saw " these days " in this sentence? Yes, it seems better. Continuous does not seem like a good choice in this sentence.


  4. Best wishes, Clive

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CliveHi,

More and more accidents are being caused by drunk drivers every year.

Health and nutrition issues are being valued highly these days.

  1. Why is the present continous passive tense used here? The writer uses the passive to put the major emphasis on 'more and more accidents', and less on the 'drunk drivers'. The continuous stresses that this is happening all the time.
  2. Can I just say " are caused " because the first sentence seems to me a permanent truth and is occurred year after year? It's not exactly a permanent truth, there were no such accidents before cars were invented. However, you could say 'are caused' without a big change in meaning.
  3. Can I just say " have been valued " for the second sentence because I saw " these days " in this sentence? Yes, it seems better. Continuous does not seem like a good choice in this sentence.


  4. Best wishes, Clive

Hi, Clive

You said "without a big change in meaning". May I ask you what that means? Thanks.

LCCHang
Hi again,

I said that The continuous stresses that this is happening all the time. You would lose that emphasis. The simple tense states it more as a simple fact.

Best wishes again, Clive