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Can we use present or future tense after this expression "by the time" in subordinate clause?(when the main clause has present tense. )

For example,

By the time I arrive at the hotel,..........

By the time I will arrive at the hotel,......

Which one is correct?
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Comments  (Page 2) 
You don't use "by the time" for two simultaneous events.

One thing has happened before the other does. By the time the second thing happens, the other is complete. That's how you use it.

However, even for simultaneous events, you still use present for the second part of the sentence.

Susan will get here when Mike gets here. (Susan and Mike are riding together.)
Is it correct "Susan will get here while Mike will get here too." ?
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No.

Susan will get here when Mike does.

Susan will get here when Mike gets here.

Susan will get here the same time as Mike.

(PS - Welcome to English Forums!)
So ... should I understand that in the sequence of tenses if you have in the main clause a future tense you won't have it as well in the subordinate one? Isn't there a simultaneous or durative aspect in this case?

(PS - Thank you )
Yes, you use the present in the subordinate clause.

If there is an ongoing thing that will be in progress when the other event occurs, you'll see things like this:

Based on his current schedulle, he'll arrive while I am doing the shopping.

Peter will leave while James is still rehearsing.
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My last question for today: which of the following is incorrect and why?

i "I'll get there at the same time you will arrive form the airport."

ii "I'll get there by the time you would have arrived home."

(PS - Sorry for being so insistent)

After by the time use the present (or present perfect) if speaking from the viewpoint of the present:
By the time I arrive at the hotel, ...
By the time I have arrived at the hotel, ...
Use past (or past perfect) if speaking from the viewpoint of the past:
By the time I arrived at the hotel, ...
By the time I had arrived at the hotel, ...
Dear CJ,

Would you please tell me if it is possible to use the future simple tense after your first two subordinate clauses?
e.g.: By the time I arrive / have arrived at the hotel, I shall be ready to...

Also, how would you complete the other two clauses in the past?
By the time I arrived / had arrived, I...

Thank you for your help.
HelaWould you please tell me if it is possible to use the future simple tense after your first two subordinate clauses?e.g.: By the time I arrive / have arrived at the hotel, I shall be ready to...
Yes, those are possible. In fact, they are exactly what you should use.

(Hardly anybody uses "shall" these days. In "real life" you would hear "I will", or even more likely, "I'll".)
HelaAlso, how would you complete the other two clauses in the past?By the time I arrived / had arrived, I...
Here's a more complete paradigm:

By the time I arrive, I'm ready to eat. (habitual arrivals)
By the time I have (I've) arrived, I'm ready to eat. (habitual arrivals)
By the time I arrive, I'll be ready to eat. (one time anticipated event)
By the time I have (I've) arrived, I'll be ready to eat. (one time anticipated event)
By the time I arrived, I was ready to eat. (one time past event)
By the time I had (I'd) arrived, I was ready to eat. (one time past event)
By the time I arrived, I would (I'd) be ready to eat. (one time event anticipated in the past)
By the time I had (I'd) arrived, I would (I'd) be ready to eat. (one time event anticipated in the past)

CJ
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I will arrive
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