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Can we use present or future tense after this expression "by the time" in subordinate clause?(when the main clause has present tense. )

For example,

By the time I arrive at the hotel,..........

By the time I will arrive at the hotel,......

Which one is correct?
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The future time is determined by the main verb or by the context, so a verb in a subordinate clause referring to the future time appears in the simple present tense after subordinating conjunctions (after, before, until, when, as soon as..)

By the time I arrive at the hotel, I will have something to eat.
When I arrive at the hotel, I'll take/have a shower.
As soon as I get there I'll ....
"By the time I arrive at the hotel I'll have somerhing to eat" doesn't sound completely right to me. I see a difference in meaning between that sentence and "As soon as I arrive I'll have something to eat".
"By the time" in my opinion suggests that the action in the main clause started or happened before your arrival. This example makes more sense to me:
"I'm late! By the time I arrive at the hotel, she will have been waiting for hours!"
or
"By the time I arrive at the hotel, she will probably be gone."

Can anyone tell me if that's correct, please?

Thank you,

Miriam
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Yes, you are right, Miriam.. Thanks for pointing this out..

I was so focused on the "will" position, that I missed this important point. Emotion: embarrassed

By the time I arrive, they will have eaten dinner. (future perfect)

I am searching for other tenses that can be used with "by the time" expression:

I had done my English homework by the time I ate dinner last Saturday. (past perfect)

By the time I finish this course, I will have been learning English for twenty years. (future perfect continuous)

May I use it with any other tenses? I'm a little confused now.. Emotion: tongue tied

By the time i will arrive to hotel
AnonymousBy the time i will arrive to hotel
Sorry. Completely wrong.
After by the time use the present (or present perfect) if speaking from the viewpoint of the present:
By the time I arrive at the hotel, ...
By the time I have arrived at the hotel, ...
Use past (or past perfect) if speaking from the viewpoint of the past:
By the time I arrived at the hotel, ...
By the time I had arrived at the hotel, ...
CJ
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What about if speaking from the viewpoint of the future?

Ex: "Will Susan get there by the time Henry will arrive at the conference?"
Hi Pherenike22, and welcome to EnglishForward.

Pherenike22Ex: "Will Susan get there by the time Henry will arrive at the conference?"
Your example is the same as the ones already discussed in this thread, except it's a question. You need to use present tenses.

Will Susan be there by the time Henry arrives at the conference?

Emotion: smile
Ok. But why can't I use future + by the time + future ? I'm referring to a simultaneous situation of two actions in the future.
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