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Hi teachers,

Helen went to on holiday, but she is rather shy and speaks with a very low voice. She is explaining her holidays to the class but most of the students don’t understand her.

Which is the right question to be asked by one student to the one that is nearer Helen?

Important: Helen is still talking about her holidays when the question is asked.

a) What does she say?

b) What did she say?

Thanks in advance

Comments  
What is she saying? - is what I would use if I couldn't understand a single word.

What did she say? - would be appropriate if you were asking about a specific part of her speech from just a few moments ago.
The thing is that after that I want to use reported speech.

a) What does she say?

She says (that) she went to London in July.

b) What did she say?

She said (that) she went to London in July.

c) What is she saying?

She is saying (that) she went to London in July.

Which is the most appropiate one?

Thanks in advance
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Hi,
The thing is that after that I want to use reported speech.

a) What does she say? This is not a likely thing to say..

She says (that) she went to London in July.

b) What did she say?

She said (that) she went to London in July. OK

c) What is she saying?

She is saying (that) she went to London in July. OK

Which is the most appropiate one? Both are OK, but see the comments laready given by the earlier poster.

Clive
Thank you very much Clive.

Let me tell you that I found this option in a book

a) What does she say? This is not a likely thing to say..

She says (that) she went to London in July.

That's why I've asked because I didn't feel it was right.
One more to go

What if Helen says: "I want to tell you something about my holiday in .

Then, the student that didn't hear Helen should say:

What did she say?

What about the student that hear Helen very well. Which one should be his/her answer:

a) She said that she wants to tell us something about her holiday in London.

b) She said that she wanted to tell us something about her holiday in London.

Thanks in advance

Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
Thinking SpainWhat if Helen says: "I want to tell you something about my holiday in London".
Then, the student that didn't hear Helen should say:
What did she say?
That's reasonable. Yes.
Thinking SpainWhat about the student that heard Helen very well. Which one should be his/her answer:
a) She said that she wants to tell us something about her holiday in London.
b) She said that she wanted to tell us something about her holiday in London.
Either is fine. They have the same meaning. Because the response is immediate and about something currently taking place, I would probably use a).

CJ
Thank you very much for you correction and your help CalifJim. Sometimes these things drive me crazy.

T.S.