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Generally, when prices go up, consumption goes down. This is true with meat and fresh produce, but it doesn’t seem to be true with those indulging“C” foods — candy, cookies, cake, and ice cream.


Q. Which one is appropriate for understanding 'indulging "C" foods' ?

(1) C foods that make people indulge them(C foods)

(2) C foods that indulge something (??)


Based on the context, (1) is appropriate, but I don't know why it is interpreted in that way

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This is true with meat and fresh produce, but it doesn’t seem to be true for those indulging in “C” foods — candy, cookies, cake, and ice cream.

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Generally, when prices go up, consumption goes down. This is true with meat and fresh produce, but it doesn’t seem to be true with those indulging “C” foods — candy, cookies, cake, and ice cream.


Q. Which one is appropriate for understanding 'indulging "C" foods' ?

(1) C foods that make people indulge in them(C foods)

(2) C foods that indulge something (??) Inanimate things can't indulge. Only people can indulge. When the writer says 'indulging . . foods', he really means that people who eat these foods are indulging. It's rather confusing and awkward English.


Clive
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Hoony indulging “C” foods

The writer probably meant "indulgent" in the sense of "self-indulgent".

According to Google Ngrams the expression "indulgent foods" first appeared around 1980, so it's a rather new expression.

Found online:

The key to making healthful versions of indulgent foods is to choose the right ingredients.
From Thanksgiving to New Year's, indulgent foods are abundant.
Teach your kids about the foods they eat, and help them choose indulgent foods in moderation.

I did not find "indulging foods".

CJ

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