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1) He's more qualified than you, even though he's less experienced.
2) Being less experienced, he's more qualified than you.
3) He's more qualified than you, being more qualified.


3) is incorrect because present participle phrase should be fronted.

Reading your post, I have some questions.

I think it is an ambiguous sentence. There are some interpretations:
1) After I read your posts, I have some questions.
2) Before I read your posts, ----
3) When I am reading your posts, ----

I don't know how to replace an adverbial phrase with a participle clause in sentence 2). Would you help me with this? Thank you.

Pastel
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Comments  
I don't understand what you want in the first part, Pastel. Only (1) makes any sense; (2) and (3) are grammatical but irrational. PP phases don't have to be fronted, they just have to refer unequivocably to their proper referrent.

In the second set:

(1) should be 'After having read your posts, I have some questions';
(2) should be 'Before I read your posts, I had some questions' and carries the opposite meaning;
(2) can be recast as 'Having read your posts, I have some questions'; and
(3) is incorrect.
Hi, Micawber

He still came to school, even though he was sick.
Being sick, he still came to school. ( If this sentence is correct, why sentence 2 is irrational?)

In the second set,

In your sentence 2, the latter one, I think it is different from what I meant in the original post.
Yours: 'Having read your posts, I have some questions'
Mine: 'Before I read your posts, I had some questions.'

Yours is saying that "I have read your posts"(the reading is done), whereas mine is dealing with the questions.(the reading is not started yet.) I look forward to hearing from you. Thanks.
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Hi Pastel,

In the first part:

'Being less experienced, he's more qualified than you.' Irrational because experience is logically required for qualification.

'Being sick, he still came to school.' Rational because it is easily possible to come to school in spite of being sick.

In the second part:

You're absolutely right that our meanings are opposite; probably again because 'before I read your posts, I had some questions' is not a normal sequence. Let me re-recast as 'before reading your posts, I had some questions'.
<< I don't know how to replace an adverbial phrase with a participle clause in

Before I read your posts, ----- >>

Interesting challenge. I think this is one solution:

Not yet having read your posts, ----- Emotion: wink
Just curious, Mr M. Is "unequivocably" the Canadian version of "unequivocally"? Or just your personal preference? It seems to me some people like to say it that way.
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Couldn't say, Jim; didn't look it up; might not be a word; let me know, eh?
CalifJim seems to win this argument as shown [url="http://www.bartleby.com/68/21/6221.html "]here[/url], at least according to one reference.

Hope this helps.

MountainHiker
MH,

Was that an argument?
Could've fooled me! Emotion: smile

Actually, I think I've said it both ways. Can't remember now.

Thanks for the link. How do you do that? (I mean put the word 'here' in there as a link.)

I'm technically challenged!

Mr. M,

Your "eh" reminds me. A couple of years ago I was in Toronto on Canada Day, and I saw a sign that spelled Canada like this:

C eh N eh D eh. Emotion: big smile

Probably old as the hills to you, but I thought it was quite amusing.

Jim
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