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The dogs---blue-eyed huskies---were excited and yipping, their pink tongues steaming in the cold.

Is "with" being omitted? Or I think we should replace the comma with a semicomma.

The dogs---blue-eyed huskies---were excited and yipping, with their pink tongues steaming in the cold.

Pastel
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Do you mean 'semicolon'?

In any case, no, nothing else is required. The non-finite modifiers can be piled on even more thickly before the sentence becomes too heavy:

'The dogs, blue-eyed huskies, were excited and yipping, their pink tongues steaming in the cold, their paws scratching eagerly in the hard-packed snow, and their ears pricked and ready for action.'
Comments  
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Hello, MM,

Can I reverse the sentence?

"Their pink tongues steaming in the cold, the dogs were excited and yipping."
Grammatically/structurally, yes indeed, you can. Practically speaking, I don't like it as well-- it makes the streaming tongues seem less a result of the excitement and more of an incidental-- I don't know why, it's just my impression.
Okay, thank you, the Man in Japan.
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