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I thought about giving a present to them.

Is the word "giving" a present participle or a gerund in the above sentence? If it's a verb then does the phrase "about giving a prersent" a prepositional phrase or not.

GB
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gerund phrase
I thought about giving a present to them.

I = subject
'think about' is a transitive pv
'giving a present to them' is the object of the verb, and gerund phrase.
'giving' is a gerund
'a present' is the object of the gerund
to them is a prep phrase, them is the object of the prep.
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Inchoateknowledge
I thought about giving a present to them.

I = subject
'think about' is a transitive pv
'giving a present to them' is the object of the verb, and gerund phrase.
'giving' is a gerund
'a present' is the object of the gerund
to them is a prep phrase, them is the object of the prep.

I tend to disagree.

I like swimming- swimming is a gerund. Compare: I like movies. In this structure, swimming and movies are both nouns.

I like swimming in the lake during a hot day. To my understandingswimming in the lake” in this sentence becomes a participle phrase. Likewise, "about giving a present" is a present participle phrase Of course, I can be wrong. Emotion: wink
Hi GM

"I like swimming- swimming is a gerund. Compare: I like movies. In this structure, swimming and movies are both nouns."

(Even one word can be a phrase.)
We do not disagree because I am of the opinion that 'giving' is a gerund, too.Emotion: wink

swimming in the lake” No it is not a participle phrase, it is a locative adjunct
and a gerund phrase, object of the main verb.
A participle is an adjective and not a noun. Participles modify nouns.
swimming in the lake is not an adjunct, let alone a locative one.
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All the mumbo-jumbo's don't mean a thing. One word can not make a phrase. I am not a grammamrian and fancy terms don't stick too well to me. But allow me to assure you, fancy terms and phrases can not create writing skills, if you catch my drift.
Do you mean that empty vessels make the most sound by saying mumbo j?
 Gerund, it is acting as the object of preposition.
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