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Are these correct?

1. Cantona passes to Giggs, who passes to Sharp. Past

2. She walks in, comes right up to me and says..... present

3. the train leaves at 10:30 future

4. we'll phone as soon as we get there future

Comments  
1. present. Past would be "passed"
2. correct
3. hmmm... this depends on your teacher. "Leaves" is present but it is going to happen in the future.
4. this also depends on your teacher. It's the same as #3
Talking about tenses, I would like to mention a piece of advice in here, concerning the use of present tesne specifically, because it is obvious that you just misunderstand the use of present tense in the sentences mentioned above.

We use the simple present tense when:
- the action is general
- the action happens all the time, or habitually, in the past, present and future
- the action is not only happening now
- the statement is always true

Looking at the sentences "  1- 3 - 4 " shows that you misunderstand the point that Present tense is not used to show that something is happening now
For example :
The sun rises in the East ( the sun rised today morning in the east, and will rise tomorrow as well in the east  ... and so forth, But in general, it Rises in the east >> which is a present tense 

I hope i made it clear enough.
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I am sorry but I have totally misunderstand everything now

I am confused

Emotion: sad
I have to say that YoungBuddy's post has confused me too!

We do use the present tense to describe things that are happening now when we are narrating, or commentating on the action.

Sentence 1 is something you would hear in the commentary of a football match - the commentator is describing the action as it happens.

Sentence 2 would be typical of someone telling a story of an event. Although the event happened in the past, the speaker uses the present tense to make it seam more 'alive'. Newspapers and magazine articles do this a lot.
YoungBuddyLooking at the sentences "  1- 3 - 4 " shows that you misunderstand the point that Present tense is not used to show that something is happening now
I missed one word, which was a deadly mistake

I should have written "  Present tense is not used to show that something is happening now only "
This is what i meant ... 

Sorry for the confusion ... Excuse my inattention Emotion: embarrassed
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KateJSI have to say that YoungBuddy's post has confused me too!

Sentence 2 would be typical of someone telling a story of an event. Although the event happened in the past, the speaker uses the present tense to make it seam seem more 'alive'. Newspapers and magazine articles do this a lot.

Typo, sorry!