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Let’s say two friends just finished watching the movie. And one friend ask the other the following.

Have you liked the movie?

Have you enjoyed the movie?


Are these questions correct to ask with the context? Thank you in advance. 🙏🙏

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The simple past would be more natural in this situation.

Did you enjoy the movie?

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anonymousAre these questions correct to ask with the context?

No. It's "Did you [like / enjoy] the movie?"

Have you [liked / enjoyed] ...? is not used when speaking of some unique experience that is part of the current situation, like just seeing a movie, or just tasting some food for the first time, or having any kind of experience very recently.

On the rare occasions when it is used, it is often used in reference to a whole series of experiences, as when you are asked to evaluate your experiences in a survey. Note the plurals in the examples below, and the implication of many experiences over a period of time.

What have you liked/enjoyed most/least about these lessons?
What courses or training seminars have you enjoyed?
What types of things have you enjoyed learning in the past?
During the past month, how much of the time have you enjoyed the things you do?

CJ

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Comments  
Englishmaven

The simple past would be more natural in this situation.

Did you enjoy the movie?

What if the context is like:

Our guest seems happy after watching the movie. I think he has liked the movie.

Is present perfect tense correct here?

 CalifJim's reply was promoted to an answer.
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anonymousOur guest seems happy after watching the movie. I think he has liked the movie.

See my previous post. Your example here is understandable, and it may be a borderline case, but in my opinion it's not typical idiomatic English. Just say I think he liked the movie.

CJ

CalifJim
anonymousOur guest seems happy after watching the movie. I think he has liked the movie.

See my previous post. Your example here is understandable, and it may be a borderline case, but in my opinion it's not typical idiomatic English. Just say I think he liked the movie.

CJ

Thank you. I got one example though.

A: Have you seen the Marvel movie that came last week?

B: Yes, I have.


Here the present perfect tense is used perfectly, right?

Yes. That example asks whether the experience (of seeing that movie) occurred at all, not what your reaction to it is.

Have you liked the Marvel movie ... last week? is impossible.

CJ

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