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1. I have never had a problem with my heater draining the battery. Then again, came summer I replaced a fried rectifier. (Is the latter sentence okay with the first sentence with present perfect? Or do I need to use past perfect for the first sentence?)

Thanks.
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Yes, I think you should put the first verb in past perfect, since the fact no longer holds true (if I understand your mechanics aright).
1. I have never had a problem with my heater draining the battery except for that summer summer I replaced a fried rectifier. (Is this okay with present perfect? Could I also use past perfect here too?)

Thanks.
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Interesting. I wonder whether we can say that the "Then again" corrects the present perfect + "never" of the first sentence, as a stylistic device.

Though it is a little unclear and tortuously written. Maybe:

1. I have never had a problem with my heater draining the battery. Then again, last summer I had to replace a fried rectifier.

MrP
Nice observation, MrP. In discourse, it could well be. I would like to see the speaker expostulate more about his poor memory, however.
Are both of these correct? If not, why?

1. I have been calling them for 30 minutes now and no one is picking up.

2. I have been calling them for 30 minutes now and no one was picking up. (If this one is incorrect, why so? #1 is right and #1 uses only past tense? Is the structure for #2 supposed to be present perfect + present tense?)

3. I have been calling them for 30 minutes now and no one has been picking up. (Is this one correct? Would you use this one out of all the other ones?)

Thanks.
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<Are both of these correct? If not, why?>

You say "both", but you posted three examples.

<1. I have been calling them for 30 minutes now and no one is picking up.>

Correct.

<2. I have been calling them for 30 minutes now and no one was picking up. (If this one is incorrect, why so? #1 is right and #1 uses only past tense? Is the structure for #2 supposed to be present perfect + present tense?)>

Incorrect. "calling for thirty minutes now" means that you are still trying to get through.

<3. I have been calling them for 30 minutes now and no one has been picking up. (Is this one correct? Would you use this one out of all the other ones?)>

Incorrect. If someone had picked up, why would you keep calling? "No one is picking up" talks about a repetitive action.
Well, I definitely like and use #3. I suppose that #1 is possible in conversation, with the speaker stressing that there has still been no answer right up to now (yet note that I automatically go to present perfect in my explication). #2 repels me.
That's interesting. Maybe there's a BrE/AmE division here. I'd say:

1. I've been calling them for 30 minutes now and no one is answering. ] Fine; neutral.

2. I had been calling them for 30 minutes and no one was answering. ] Fine as modified.

3. I've been calling them for 30 minutes now and no one has been answering. ] Fine; "emphatic" or "pointed" or "through gritted teeth".

MrP
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