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1. I have talked to her a couple days ago asking her what we were going to do for Valentines. (Is 'were' okay with present perfect? Or 'were' has nothing to do with present ence part of the sentence?)

2. I have talked to her a couple days ago asking her what we are going to do for Valentines. (Is using 'are' better than using 'were'? Or it does not matter?)

3. I have talked to her a couple days ago and I asked her what we were going to do for Valentines. (Does the meaning of this sentence has a meaning very alike of #1?)

Thanks.
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Sorry, I'm not going to really answer your question, but I think that, with "ago", you don't use the present perfect... It should be a simple past. This being said, I would use neither 1. nor 2.

"I talked to her a couple days ago, and asked her what we were going to do for Valentines" (I'm not familiar with that expression)
When to use P.P.: when something took place sometime in the past and still on going. i.e. I have taken Spanish since my first year of college. P.P. tense covers the past to the present.

When to use Past Perfect tense: When something took place in the past and end in the past before another event took place. i.e. 1) I had taken biology for 2 years before I changed my major to computer science. 2) She had spent weeks working on the China Branch project before she found out she has been reassigned.

Past perfect tense seems to be where students get the most confused. When using Past perfect, remember Past P. is used to define time from the past in reference to the next event which may have taken place in the past or up to the present. I.e

She had worked as a secretary since she graduated from college but she has recently returned to school to be a paralegal.

Hope that helps you
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What's the difference in meaning between a couple of days ago and a couple days ago?
Hi,

What's the difference in meaning between a couple of days ago and a couple days ago?

The intended meaning is the same. It's just that the latter omits 'of'. I wouldn't advise you to omit it in your English exam.

Best wishes, Clive
In my opinion, I think there is a slight difference.

I turned in my paper a few days ago – not sure when , perhaps 3-4 days ago

I turned in my paper a couple of days ago – implied 2, no more than 3

I finished that paper days ago – this carries a tone of cockiness – that’s a piece of cake, no problem attitude.

It all depends on the context in which you use the phrases. But in a bulk sense, the mean pretty much the same.
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Goodman In my opinion, I think there is a slight difference.

I turned in my paper a few days ago – not sure when , perhaps 3-4 days ago

I turned in my paper a couple of days ago – implied 2, no more than 3

Do you mean that there is a slight difference in meaning between a couple of days ago and a couple days ago?
Are both of these possible? What do they mean? What do I use #1 and #2?

1. I have never seen a kid that wanted an Xbox so badly before.

2. I have never seen a kid that wants an Xbox so badly before.

Thanks.
Are both of these possible? What do they mean? When What do I use #1 and #2?

1. I have never seen a kid that wanted an Xbox so badly before.
1. I had never seen a kid who wanted an Xbox so badly.


2. I have never seen a kid that wants an Xbox so badly before.
2. I have never seen a kid who wants an Xbox so badly.

I think it's better to change the tenses as shown. In #1, you are recounting an event which occured in the past. In #2, you are describing an event that is still current.
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