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The follwing sentence is quoted from Oxford Practice Grammar written by John Eastwood:
I'm working at a sports shop for six months.
What I have learned from so many grammar books is that we must use present perfect continuous tense when there is time reference. So according to what I have learned the above sentence should be
I've been working at a sports shop for six months.

I would like to know whether the first sentence from the Oxford book is wrong or not.
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I hear the Oxford version a lot, but don't use it myself. I've always thought it was regional.

I use the version you "have learned."
Hi,
AvangiI use the version you "have learned."
So do I.

Regards
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To me, there's a difference between:

1) I'm working at a sports shop for six months.

and

2) I've been working at a sports shop for six months.

1) refers to the past/present/future (eg. the speaker started working at the shop yesterday, it's his current job, and he's going to work there for the next six months).

2) refers to a period that started six months ago and continues up to the present (the speaker is still working at the shop).
ozzourti1) refers to the past/present/future (eg. the speaker started working at the shop yesterday, it's his current job, and he's going to work there for the next six months).
That's very interesting.
What indicates that he will be working at the sports shop for such a specific period in the future?
JohnParisThat's very interesting.What indicates that he will be working at the sports shop for such a specific period in the future?
Just an example. It could well be: he started working two months ago, it's his current job, and is going to work there for the next four months. The sentence simply indicates the speaker's "present activity" as well as informs the listener of its total (planned) duration.
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ozzourtiThe sentence simply indicates the speaker's "present activity" as well as informs the listener of its total (planned) duration.
"It could well be", "The sentence ... informs the listener of its total (planned) duration."
Which words - exactly - indicate the total planned duration?
You are attempting to predict the future, and this is not possible.
If it is, would you please supply me with tonight's winning Loto number? I could really use the cash.
JohnParisWhich words - exactly - indicate the total planned duration?
"for six months"

I'm not trying to predict the future but it's possible that the speaker is talking about a temporary job just for six months.

EDIT: Just to clarify -- all I'm saying is that in my opinion the first sentence expresses plans for the near future and isn't really equivalent to the second one.
And to elaborate further:

1) I'm working at a sports shop for six months. (I am working at a sports shop and my plan is to work there for a period of six months in total.)

2) I've been working at a sports shop for six months. (I started working at a sports shop six months ago and I am still working in said shop.)

The first sentence could be perfectly clear given a proper context:

- It's been a while, John! I wasn't expecting to see you here at all. What are you doing in New York?
- Hey Steve! Well, I'm working at a sports shop for six months, part-time, then I'll probably change jobs.

I apologize for jumping to conclusions in my earlier posts but that was all I could do without a context, merely stabbing in the dark.

I hope I've managed to get my point across this time. Or am I only imagining this?
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