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It says,
“The Present Perfect Continuous tense is used to express continuous, ongoing actions which have already been completed at the time of speaking or writing.”

Then, for instance,
“I have been reading an illustrated book about birds.”
I understand this implies that I am not reading the book now.
But does this suggest that I have finished the book already?
Could it possibly be used to describe my current situation, when I’ve read the book up to 200 pages so far, and I have 150 pages more to go?

Thanks in advance.
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Comments  
It does not mean that you have necessarily finished the book. You could have read only 200 pages. The meaning is ambiguous.

If you have finished the book, you might say, "I have read an illustrated book about birds" to indicate an action completed relative to the present. If you have not finished the book, you might say, "I am reading an illustrated book about birds."

The Present Perfect Continuous (also called "Progressive") Tense means that at the present moment the action is not ongoing. Rather the action is part of a series of actions; the whole series may or may not have been completed.

-I have been running every day. (I am not running now. I may or may not continue my series of runs tommorrow.)

-We have been buying our groceries at Sam's. (We are not buying any right now. We may or may not buy groceries at Sam's in the future.)

-I have been reading an illustrated book about birds. (I am not reading it right now. I probably have not finished it. I probably will continue my series of reads in the future until I do.)
Hello rvw, and thank you for your clear explanation. I have a question.

Does your principle: [The Present Perfect Continuous Tense means that at the present moment the action is not ongoing] also hold when the sentence includes a time adverbial ? That is, for example:

(1) I have been running for an hour.
or
(2) For an hour, I have been running.

I've read in some book that in (2) the only possible interpretation is this extends up to the present moment. (In (1) such an interpretation is not so strictly necessary.)

I've read in some another thread about this question ... I've forgot where. Would you help me?
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Hello, rvw, I have one more little question (just out of a curiosity):

Can I say:

# I have been running frequently.

in the similar way as ?

Thank you for your help, in advance. Roro
I have one more question (your explanation intrigued me).

Can I use the simple present form in your examples without a great change of their meanings?

That is:

-I run every day. (I am not running now. I may or may not continue my series of runs tommorrow.)

-We buy our groceries at Sam's. (We are not buying any right now. We may or may not buy groceries at Sam's in the future.)

-I read (sometimes, often) an illustrated book about birds. (I am not reading it right now. I probably have not finished it. I probably will continue my series of reads in the future until I do.)

I will really appreciate your help! Roro
Hello Infinity

[url="http://www.e-anglais.com/cours/present_perfect.html "]E-anglais[/url] explains this way about "I've been reading something".

If you don't know French, you can ask Madame Pieanne to translate it.

Present Perfect Progressive (or Continuous)

On emploie la forme progressive du Present Perfect:
Lorsqu'il s'agit d'une action qui continue ou de la durée d'une action.

Ex 1. I've been playing tennis since I was 7.
Ex 2. I've been reading Pickwick Papers.

Dans le premier cas, je vous informe que je joue au tennis depuis l'âge de 7 ans
(et vous pouvez supposer que je n'y ai pas renoncé).
Dans le deuxième cas, je vous informe que ces derniers temps, je lis Pickwick Papers
(et vous pouvez supposer que je n'ai pas encore terminé ma lecture).

paco
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Roro,

It's interesting how for an hour adds a context to I have been running.

I agree that

"... in (2) the only possible interpretation is this extends up to the present moment. (In (1) such an interpretation is not so strictly necessary.) "

except it's still possible that you stopped to say For an hour, I have been running.
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I think you can say I have been running frequently and be grammatically correct and semantically clear.
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I think you can use the present tense:

-I run every day.
-We buy our groceries at Sam's.

without a great change in meaning. Of course the context might make the present or the present perfect progressive tense more appropriate.

I read (sometimes often)... seems grammatically correct but awkward.
Hello, rvw, thank you very much ! You cleared up my uncertainty.
I really appreciate your help.
Hello dear,

first of thanks so much for your beautiful Explening of Present perfect continuous,

Thanks

hashmat Froogh from Afghanistan
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