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Hallo there,

Can anyone tell me when to use Present perfect continuous and Present perfect?

The senteces below are the examples;

Present perfect continuous;

-I have been studying English for 6 months.

-I have been living in England for 3 years now

Present perfect;

-I have studied English for 6 months.

-I have lived in England for 3 years now.

I suppose the sentences are saying the same thing; I am still studying English and I am still living in England. Is my understanding correct?

Thanks in advance
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Comments  
Yes in this case they really are the same. Students are often confused betweeen these tenses as natives swap between using them with very little difference in meaning.

The main difference is

I have studied English for 6 months = The focus is on the result (therefore your English has improved over the 6 months).

I have been studying English for 6 months = The focus is on the action. (We assume your English has improved but it explains what you have been doing for 6 months).

If you want to highlight the actions us the continuous and if the result is the inportant part use the simple.

Dave
The 1st sentences imply you are still study and living, where as the 2nd sentences may imply that you have just finished.
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AnonymousThe 1st sentences imply you are still study and living, where as the 2nd sentences may imply that you have just finished.
Not always.
The 1st sentences imply you are still study and living, where as the 2nd sentences may imply that you have just finished.[/quote]
Not always.[/quote]

Dave Phillips,

Thank you for your explanation, but you said that the 2nd sentence does not always imply that I have just finished studying and living in England. Would you please explain it more to me? I need to understand this..Emotion: smile

Thanks and regards,

Cathy
It is focusing on the result it doesn't mean the action is always finished. I have lived in London for 12 years. I will say that although I still live in London. It just means that I know London having been here for 12 years.
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Your explanation is incisive, thanks again
-I have studied English to 6 months.

-I have lived in England to 3 years now.
I think its "for".
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