+0
Hello,

Could you please suggest which of the tenses suits the following

sentence best, present or past perfect?

"Sometimes young students at their young age come up with ideas

that their teachers has/had never thought of."

On the one hand, I do not talk about the present moment, so there

is no need to say that something hasn't been done until now. On the

other hand, using past perfect here would imply that I'm talking about

cases in the past; however, they are occuring nowadays and will occur

in future. Could you please help me to resolve this dilemma?

Thanks in advance.

--

Victor
+0
Hi,

Say it this way.

"Sometimes young students at their young age come up with ideas
that their teachers have has/had never thought of."

Clive

edited Sorry, I crossed through some words, but that feature does not seem to be working for me. Here is what I suggested, with the crossed through parts simply deleted.
"Sometimes young students come up with ideas that their teachers have never thought of."
Comments  
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
Because of the plural "teachers", the choice is between "have" and "had". You don't really need the repetition of "young". You can say:

"Sometimes young students come up with ideas that their teachers have never thought of." -- students do this now, or they do this generally (without reference to a specific time).

"Sometimes young students came up with ideas that their teachers had never thought of." -- students did this in the past; will usually refer to some particular situation that is apparent from the wider context.
Hello Clive, Mr Wordy,

Thanks for your answers.

Clive> ...their teachers have has/had never thought of.

Oops, my typo. Surely, it should had been "have", not "has".

Mr Wordy> came up... had never thought of – students did this

Mr Wordy> in the past; will usually refer to some particular situation

Mr Wordy> that is apparent from the wider context.

In my case, there is no any particular situation that took place in

the past, so my choice is apparently present perfect.

--

Victor
victor_amelkinIn my case, there is no any particular situation that took place in
the past, so my choice is apparently present perfect.
Yes, if you are talking about the general behaviour of students then present perfect is the way to go.
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies