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Hi,
could you tell me if my sentence is correct?
"She has bought a new washing machine even though her old one was working well"
I am particularly worried about the usage of past simple. Wouldn't it be better to use present simple in this sentence "even though her old one is still working well"?

Thank you
Comments  
<"She has bought a new washing machine even though her old one was working well">

Yes, It's OK. It gives the feeling that she has now disconnected, or got rid of, her old machine.

I think this would be more common though:

"She bought a new washing machine even though her old one was working well"

"She has bought a new washing machine even though her old one is well"
Thanks, Milky.
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"She has bought a new washing machine even though her old one was working well" BrE

"She bought a new washing machine even though her old one was working well" AmE

Both correct, IMO.
Marius Hancu"She has bought a new washing machine even though her old one was working well" BrE

"She bought a new washing machine even though her old one was working well" AmE

Both correct, IMO.


And if the purchase was very recent, do AE speakers still use only the past simple form there?
Matter of preference, but see:

Differences Between American and British English

Use of the Present Perfect

http://esl.about.com/library/weekly/aa110698.htm?once=true&
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
Much depends on the context. Here are some possibilities:

1. Did I tell you about my next door neighbour? She bought a new washing machine even though the old one was still working perfectly well.

2. I don't know what to do about the old lady next door. She's bought a new washing machine, even though the old one was still working perfectly well.

3. I don't know what to do about the old lady next door. She's bought a new washing machine, even though the old one is still working perfectly well.

In #1, the speaker presents the incident as complete: it's in the past.

In #2, there's a connection between the incident and the present: buying a new washing machine needlessly is an example of the strange behaviour that worries me. She has probably disposed of the old washing machine.

In #3, as #2, except that she probably still has the old washing machine. (For instance, maybe the new one hasn't been delivered yet.)

MrP
Yet both these are possible:

1. Did I tell you about my next door neighbour? She bought a new washing machine this morning even though the old one was still working perfectly well.

2. Did I tell you about my next door neighbour? She's bought a new washing machine even though the old one was still working perfectly well.

There, the choice is more about definite versus indefinite information.