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Scenario: My car was stolen and it was missing for a week but I have gotten it back now.

Which one of these do I use? Are both of them okay? What do they mean?

1. My car was missing for a week before I got it back.

2. My car has been missing for a week days before I got it back.

Are these sentences correct?

4. My car was stolen and it has been missing for a week but I have gotten it back now.

5. My car was stolen and it had been missing for a week but I have gotten it back now.

For story telling, is this sentece okay? Is the use of present perfect okay? Or do I just stick with just present tense? Why?

6. Scenario: My car has stolen and it has missing for a week but I have gotten it back now.

Thanks.
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My car was missing for a week before I got it back.
My car had been missing for a week before I got it back.

Not: My car has been missing for a week before I got it back.
(If it has been missing for week, it has been missing until now. If it has been missing until now, then you have not yet gotten it back. Yet, you continue with the contradictory phrase that says you did get it back, namely, the phrase "before I got it back". You can't have a sentence which says opposite things!)

My car was stolen, and it has been missing for a week, but I have gotten it back now. (Also contradictory as described above, but can be used when you mean that you have just very recently gotten it back.)
My car was stolen, and it had been missing for a week, but I have gotten it back now. (Acceptable. The week the car was missing was not the week ending today.)

My car had stolen, and it has missing for a week, but I have gotten it back now. (This won't work at all.)
My car had been stolen, and it had been missing for a week, but I have gotten it back now. (Acceptable.)

CJ
Comments  
Not: My car has been missing for a week before I got it back.
As mentioned that I can't have contradictory things.

Scenario: I haven't seen her for a long time and now I'm seeing her and I say:

1. I haven't seen you for a long time until now! How have you been? (I'm seeing her now, how come I can still use 'haven't seen her for a long time?)

Thanks.