What is the difference between Present Perfect and Present Perfect Continuous

Like for instance is in this sentence:

*I have lived in Victoria for five years. (meaning, I still live in Victoria, and this action have not finished yet.)

*I have been living in Victoria for five years.

Thanks in advance.
The second shows heightened interest, concern, enthusiasm or immediacy in some way.
Mister MicawberThe second shows heightened interest, concern, enthusiasm or immediacy in some way.
So, do you mean, Present Perfect and Present Perfect Continuous are almost the same in some other way? Kindly tell me what it is that makes these two tenses different from each other...
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My answer above indicates the difference: my response to what you asked for in your initial post.
aerohnSo, do you mean, Present Perfect and Present Perfect Continuous are almost the same in some other way?
The point is that they are the same in meaning. The difference is in the attitude of the speaker toward the statement. Continuous tenses almost always show more enthusiam or immediacy than the corresponding simple tenses. To me, that simply means that the speaker invites the listener to imagine the situation in greater detail when the -ing is used.

No -ing. have lived The speaker is presenting the facts in an objective neutral way.

With -ing. have been living The speaker is thinking about the day-to-day activities that occurred during that time.

The choice would depend on other elements in the conversation, such as who you are talking to, and why.

Talking to a real estate agent who might be asked to sell your house, you'd probably say, "I have lived here for X years." (The agent is not interested in thinking about how you spent your time in the house.) Talking to someone in the neighborhood who was admiring the plantings in your front yard, you might say, "I have been living here for X years." (The neighbor might be wondering where you bought those plantings, how you take care of them, water them, prune them, and so on.)

As you see, it depends on whether the context demands a brief and factual account or a more expansive and engaging account. The facts are the same in either case.

CJ