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Are the following expressions gramatically incorrect?

I have been walking my dog these three years.

He has been playing at the Wimbledon since he was 18 years old.

A private English school's website in Japan says the above expressions should be changed to:

I have walked my dog these three years.

He has played at the Wimbledon since he was 18 years old.

The site explains that the present perfect progressive form cannot be used to describe people's habitual activities unless the activities have been in progress without a break.
Comments  
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I have been walking my dog these three years.-- OK

He has been playing at Wimbledon since he was 18 years old.-- OK

A private English school's website in Japan says the above expressions should be changed to:

I have walked my dog these three years.-- OK

He has played at Wimbledon since he was 18 years old.-- OK

The site explains that the present perfect progressive form cannot be used to describe people's habitual activities unless the activities have been in progress without a break.-- Not true; it merely emphasizes the durational quality. However, I can see that that ambiguity could arise; in that case, it would be wise to choose the non-progressive

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Thank you Mister Micawber for your quick reply as usual.

Your explanation is very clear and I fully got it.
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Mister Micawber
I have walked my dog these three years.-- OK

He has played at Wimbledon since he was 18 years old.-- OK

The site explains that the present perfect progressive form cannot be used to describe people's habitual activities unless the activities have been in progress without a break.-- Not true; it merely emphasizes the durational quality. However, I can see that that ambiguity could arise; in that case, it would be wise to choose the non-progressive

I forgot to ask you one more thing.

You wrote "ambiguity could arise."

Do you mean "He has been playing at Wimbledon since he was 18 years old" implies that he will continue playing tennis at Wimbledon while "He has played at...." impies that he may stop playing at Wimbledon in the future?
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No. Please pay attention to your own posts:
The site explains that the present perfect progressive form cannot be used to describe people's habitual activities unless the activities have been in progress without a break.

If ambiguity arises about 'unbroken habitual' because of use of the progressive, then use the non-progressive form. In your examples, no reasonable mind would expect the dog-walking or tennis-playing to be interminable.
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Mister MicawberIf ambiguity arises about 'unbroken habitual' because of use of the progressive, then use the non-progressive form. In your examples, no reasonable mind would expect the dog-walking or tennis-playing to be interminable.
Thank you. I understood.
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Hi,

Are the following expressions gramatically incorrect? No.



I have been walking my dog these three years.

He has been playing at the Wimbledon since he was 18 years old.



A private English school's website in Japan says the above expressions should be changed to:



I have walked my dog these three years.

He has played at the Wimbledon since he was 18 years old.



The site explains that the present perfect progressive form cannot be used to describe people's habitual activities unless the activities have been in progress without a break. I don't agree.

eg from a club tennis site http://www.tennisnyc.com/summeradvance2.htm

(He) just moved to NYC few months ago from Lyon France. Presently, he works full time for a major French Cosmetic Company in Manhattan. A very good solid player, he has been playing tennis since he was a kid. He remains unbeatable in the league.

Best wishes, Clive