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Hallo,

What is the difference between these two sentences?

1 I have just had my lunch
2 I just have had my lunch

The idea behind asking this question is to know where to place ‘just’ correctly and whether the use of ‘just’ used in sentence 2 gives a slightly different meaning to it from sentence one. Is it correct to use ‘just’ the way it is used in sentence 2?

PS- I need a very detailed answer.

Thanks
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1 I have just had my lunch
2 I just have had my lunch

The idea behind asking this question is to know where to place ‘just’ correctly and whether the use of ‘just’ used in sentence 2 gives a slightly different meaning to it from sentence one. Is it correct to use ‘just’ the way it is used in sentence 2?

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The normal neutral positioning for adverbs, when there are two verbs, is between them. This is reflected in #1. In #2 there is a greater emphasis on 'just' and it is seen and understood to be more emphatic.
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Hello

What Pieanne told is called 'middle position' by grammarians. The middle position is
(Rule A) before the main verb
(Rule B) after 'be' [in passive voice]
(Rule C) after the first auxiliary verb
My grammar book says 'just' usually comes at middle positions.
(1) They just finished it. [Satisfy A]
(2) It was just finished. [Satisfy B]
(3) They have just finished it. [Satisfy A and C]
(4) They will just finish it. [Satisfy A and C]

But people actually use 'just' the way like as follows;
(5) It has just been finished it. (google hits;5590)
It has been just finished it. (71)
(6) They will have just finished it. (1190)
They will just have finished it. (112)
(7) It will been just finished it. (42)
It will just been finished it. (33)

I feel the position rule for 'just' is rather that it comes before the main verb and after 'have'.

paco
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I'd even say the adverb is to be placed Behind the auxiliary and Before the main verb.
 paco2004's reply was promoted to an answer.
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But people actually use 'just' the way like as follows;
(5) It has just been finished it. (google hits;5590)
It has been just finished it. (71)
(6) They will have just finished it. (1190)
They will just have finished it. (112)
(7) It will been just finished it. (42)
It will just been finished it. (33)

The sentences in (5) and (7) are not right. Are you sure about those?

CJ
Hello

CJ,

'Just' in time sense is 'a short time ago'. So I agree sentences labeled as [4] [6] [7] are wrong without attaching some appropriate when-clauses. As for the sentences [5], I noticed I forgot deleting the last 'it' when I modified the pasted ones. Thank you for the correction.

paco