+6
Hi teachers,
According to this sentence, 'She has studied Spanish.'
The speaker uses the present perfect, to say two things:
1. That the thing did happen.
2. That it has, in the speaker's mind, a particular relevance to the present.

How about this one, 'She studied Spanish.'
The speaker uses the simple past to say:
1. That the thing did happen.
That's all, isn't it?

Thanks in advance.
+0

Yes, you're right.

1 2 3
Comments  
In theory, yes.
Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.
Hi Mister Micawber,
Thank you for your reply. There's always a big gap between theory and practice, isn't there? Emotion: it wasnt me

TS
Yes. Nevertheless, you have the core concepts there.
Remember that all attempts to describe how we use tenses and aspects are just that - attempts With well over 350 million native speakers in the world, there must be, at an extremely conservative estimate indeed, 5 billion past/simple/present perfect sentences spoken and/or written every single day. If you think of the main varieties, those of the USA, the UK, Canada, Australia, Ireland and New Zealand, and the dialects within those varieties, then it is not surprising that it is often difficult to say precisely what is meant by a partcular tense/aspect in an isolated utterance.
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
Hi fivejedjon,
Thank you for your reply.
Nothing to discuss about that. But when a student asks what the difference is in those two sentences, I have to give an answer that goes futher than those 5 billion past/simple/present perfect sentences spoken and/or written every single day. Don't you think so.Emotion: wink
This is for me the closest definition, if it doesn't have any grammar errors, that I can find for this sentence,. 'She had phoned him.'
Because of the present perfect tense, the sentence informs us of what she has done at an indefinite point in time in the past and in the speaker's mind it has a particular relevance to the present, it is affecting the present situation.

TS
Sorry it should be, 'This is for me the closest explanation ...,'She has phoned him'.

TS
The first sentence (Present Perfect) has as much relevance to the present as Past Simple does. This is not exclusively Present Perfect's feature. You should better describe Present Perfect as:

1. The action completed.
2. It completed recently.

While Past Simple can be used to describe just any past action. For that reason it's called Simple.
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
rinoceronteWhile Past Simple can be used to describe just any past action. For that reason it's called Simple.
No. it's simple because it shows only tense; it does not additionally show an aspect such as progressive or perfect.
Show more