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Hey people...

My teacher has taught me that when appear "THIS" in a phrase, so I musn't use the present perfect but, what you think about that:

She worked hard this past week.

or

She has worked hard this past week.

?
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demaryiShe has worked hard this past week.
Whether your teacher is using the correct method or not in teaching the present perfect, "this" implies a relationship to the present. i.e. Jane has improved her overall grades tremendously this semester...

But reware, not all present perfect sentences have "this" as an indicator to imply present time.
" I have done nothing wrong"
" We've met several times, but nothig substantial was discussed."
Sorry, but I think you don't understand me.

I'll try again:

My teacher said to me: When the phrase have "this" you can use present perfect tense.

Ex.: I haven't run a mile this week.

Despite the phrase express a period, it can be used with present perfect tense.

But, in the phrase that I used as exemple it seems weird, because dispite the phrase to have "this", it express a complete period = "past week".

What you think about it?
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Actually, I've written wrong at the first post. Sorry!
I undertood you fine. Perhaps you didn't understand my explanation. Let me try this: I haven't done any grocery shopping this week, or I haven't done any excercise this week. Notice, "this" week still means present. I am speaking at this moment in present perfect voice.
demaryiBut, in the phrase that I used as exemple it seems weird, because dispite the phrase to have "this", it express a complete period = "past week".
.

Another important thing to remember is that we can not use any past time marker in present perfect contexts.
wrong: "I haven't seen Paul last week/ yesterday "
Correct: "I haven't seen Paul this morning yet"
demaryiEx.: I haven't run a mile this week.
Despite the phrase express a period, it can be used with present perfect tense.
If you normally run 10 mile a week and you have not been able to do that becasue you have been sick for the last few days, you can say " I haven't done any running this week". This is the same explanation I gave you in the last posts.
The rule for the present perfect is that it started in the past and still is relevant to the present.

Example:
I didn't run a mile on Monday.
I didn't run a mile on Tuesday.
I didn't run a mile on Wednesday.
I didn't run a mile today.
Today is Thursday.

As a result, I haven't run a mile this week.

If it sounds strange to you, then practice it out loud until you get used to it.

There is more on this at the following link (just ignore the teaser in German):

http://www.vnr.de/b2b/kommunikation/sprachkurse/grammatikfalle-since-for-in.html
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AnonymousI didn't run a mile on Monday.
I didn't run a mile on Tuesday.
I didn't run a mile on Wednesday.
I didn't run a mile today.
Today is Thursday.

As a result, I haven't run a mile this week.
AnonymousAs a result, I haven't run a mile this week.
Beware of the dubious suggestion:
Is it "one mile a week", or one mile a day"?

demaryiMy teacher has taught me that when appear "THIS" in a phrase, so I musn't use the present perfect
demaryiMy teacher said to me: When the phrase have "this" you can use present perfect tense.
You seem to be saying contradictory things here. First your teacher says you mustn't use the present perfect, then your teacher says you can use the present perfect tense.

There is no ban on using the present perfect with "this" + time period. It means that the thing described happened (or didn't happen) during that time period. For example, these are all OK:

She has worked hard this past week.

I haven't seen her this month.

I've trained hard all this year.
Mr WordyYou seem to be saying contradictory things here.
Yes. Actually, the original poster apologized for the confusion in a later post:

Actually, I've written wrong at the first post. Sorry!

CJ
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