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What's the difference in meaning between the following sentences?

1. Millions of people watch the program every night.

2. Millions of people are watching the program every night.
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Comments  (Page 2) 
sitifan However, if I were to hear "I'll have you to know" with the same meaning as "I'll have you know", I'd expect it to be either a poetic/archaic usage or part of a regional dialect
"I had someone [available] to answer my call" is current useage. "I had someone to do the washing." / "I had someone do the washing." (different meanings)

These days "I had someone to answer my call" no longer means "I instructed someone to answer my call." If this is what we mean, we omit the "to," as you suggest.

Your "to visit" example represents yet a third iteration with a new meaning.
YankeeHi Sitifan

Sentence 4 suggests to me that the daily driving has just recently begun and is viewed by the speaker as a temporary situation.

The same sort of thing applies to sentence 6. The daily bringing of milk sounds like something that has just begun and also that it is being viewed as a temporary or short-term situation.

This basically is the same thing that Clive said earlier.

Do you mean sentence 6 is as acceptable as sentence 4?
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Hi Sitifan

I agree with Avangi's take on the meaning -- "had someone [available] to do something". I would also add that it's not an unusual usage at all.
sitifanDo you mean sentence 6 is as acceptable as sentence 4?
Yes, in the right context, it would be no problem.
sitifan
CalifJimLast year, it seemed that the phone company always had someone to answer my complaint calls personally. This year I am waiting on hold every time I call.
Apparently, the book A hand-book of present-day English (by E. Kruisinga) was written in 1914, so today -- nearly a hundred years later!-- there are bound to be a few things in that book that are no longer widely used. I've never heard anyone use "to" in the phrase "I'll have you know" when the meaning is basically "I'd like to point this out in order to be sure you know it". However, if I were to hear "I'll have you to know" with the same meaning as "I'll have you know", I'd expect it to be either a poetic/archaic usage or part of a regional dialect (as Marius has suggested). You need to analyze what Google is giving you -- just looking at the number of Google hits alone is frequently not a reliable indicator of usage.

In addition, I'd also like to point out that "I'll have him visit" and "I'll have him to visit" (for example) have different meanings:

I'll have him visit = I will cause him to visit me or someone else (i.e. he will visit me)
I'll have him to visit = It is possible for me to visit him (i.e. I will visit him!)
http://www.EnglishForward.com/English/HaveSbToDo/zwpwz/post.htm


What warp in the fabric of the universe have I spilled through?

CJ
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CalifJim What warp in the fabric of the universe have I spilled through?
Do you believe in wormholes?
What warp in the fabric of the universe have I spilled through?
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I don't understand your question?
CJ has accidentally become a time traveler.
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What warp in the fabric of the universe have I spilled through? = What in the world does this post have to do with the topic we were discussing? (namely, simple and progressive aspect in the present tense)

It's a rhetorical question; it doesn't require an answer!

CJ
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